Tripitaka

Buddhist - The complete canon of Buddhist. Writings. The work comprises three collections, the Abhidharma Pitaka - there are different versions of this collection but they all contain similar ideas and material, the Sutta Pitaka which contains accounts of Buddha's teachings and the Vinaya Pitaka, a code of ethics. In English, it runs to 136 volumes. Also known as Tripitaka, Ch'en Kuang-jui, Ch'en Kuang-jui, Tripitaka, T'ang Seng, T'ang Seng, Tripitaka, Tipitaka, Tipitaka, Tripitaka, Tripitaka, Tripithaka, Tripithaka, Tripitaka or Tripitaka.
Chinese - (602-664). The name taken by Ch'en Kuang-jui. When he became a monk. He travelled from China to India to obtain the Buddhist scriptures. In one version, the emperor gave him a white horse for the journey but this animal was swallowed by a dragon so Tripitaka rode the dragon instead. His mortal companion on the journey was the priest, Sha Ho-shang, and they were guided and advised by the monkey-god, Hanuman, in the form of Sun Hou-tzu, and helped by Chu Pa-chieh, a piglike god. Buddha had arranged eighty-one tests for the pilgrim, all of which, with the help of his companions, he overcame. An alternative story says that Ch'en married Wen-chiao, daughter of Yin K'ai Shan. She caught the fancy of the boatman, Liu Hung, who killed Ch'en and assumed his identity. When her child by Ch'en was born, Wen-chiao cast the boy adrift on the Yangtze from which he was rescued by a monk, Chang Lao. When the boy was of age, he took the name Hsüan Tsang and went in search of his family. He found his grandmother and his mother who gave him a letter for her father, Yin K'ai Shan, who came to her aid and killed the imposter, Liu Hung. The body of Ch'en then appeared out of the river and he came back to life, having been preserved by the Dragon King, Lung Wang, who had once, in the form of a carp, been treated kindly by Ch'en. Later, Hsüan Tsang was chosen to travel to India to receive the Buddhist scriptures. He translated the Abhidharmakosa used by the Kosa sect and founded the Fa-hsing School. Also commonly identified as Tripitaka, Ch'en Kuang-jui, Ch'en Kuang-jui, Tripitaka, T'ang Seng, T'ang Seng, Tripitaka, Tipitaka, Tipitaka, Tripitaka, Tripitaka, Tripithaka, Tripithaka, Tripitaka or Tripitaka.

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