Sakhmet

Egyptian - Goddess of fire and war, goddess of Memphis in some accounts. A name for Isis. Daughter of Ra. Wife of Ptah. Mother of Imhotep and Nefertem. She is regarded as an aspect of the angry Hathor and in this role she ravaged the earth, killing mankind, on the orders of Ra who had become disenchanted by man's lack of respect for him. To halt the slaughter, Ra flooded the earth with khakadi, a redcoloured beer. Sakhmet got drunk and forgot her mission. In another story, she was rescued by Ashur from a gazelle who had abducted her and she became his consort as Mekhit. In some cases she merged with the cat-goddess Bast and with Mut, the vulture-goddess, while others say that she was the consort of Seker. She is often depicted as having the head of a lioness. Also called Sakhmet, Bast, Bast, Ailuros, Atet, Bastet, Bubastis, Little Cat, Mau, Mew, Ubastet, Ubasti, LittleCat, Ma(a)u, Pasht, Shesmetet, Greek Artemis, Great Cat, Great Cat, Hathor, Hathor, Athyr, Het-Hert, Lady of Byblos, Lady of Dendera, Lady of Faience, Lady of the West, Lady of Turquoise, Mut, Triphis, Anit, Great Mother, Qedeshet Sakhmet, Tafner, Triphis, Canaanite Baalat, Tanit, Greek Aphrodite, Mesopotamian Ishtar, Athor, Nekmet- Awai, Tauret, Isis, Isis, Aset, Ast, Aust, Eset, Esu, Lady of the Beginning, Lady of the Emerald, Lady of the Turquoise, Our Lady, Queen of Heaven, sacred birds, Star of the Sea, Unt, Watch Merti, As(e)t, Eenohebis, Hes(a)t, Iahu, Mother of God, Thousand Named, Urethekau, Werethekau, Greek Athena, Demeter, Isia, Io, Stella Maris, Manat, Ziza, Mighty One, Mighty One, Dagda, The, Dagda, Powerful, The, Powerful, The, Sachmet, Sachmet, Sekhauit, Sekhauit, Sakhautet, Sakhautet, Sekhem, Sekhem, Sekhet, Sekhet, Sekhmet, Sekhmet, Sechmet, Sekmet, Sekmet, Semetet, Semetet, Eye of Ra, Eye of Ra, Eye of Atum, Hathor-Sakhmet, Qedeshet, udjat, uraeus, Mekhit, Mekhit, Mai-hesa, Mehit, Sekhautet, Sekhautet, Sek(h)met, Sek(h)met, The Powerful, The Powerful, Babaylonian Allat, Babaylonian Allat, Greek Sakhmis or Greek Sakhmis.

Nearby Myths