Roman Lore, Gods, Demigods, Heroes, Symbols, and Other Famous Mythological Characters

Abeona

A goddess of children and revellers. In some lore, occasionally called Abeona, Adeona or Adeona.

Aborigines

A tribe said to have originated in Greece who founded Rome. Also commonly identified as Aborigines.

Abundantia

A fertility-goddess, goddess of plenty. Occasionally known as Abundantia, German Abundia, German Abundia, Fulla, Norse Fulla, Norse Fulla, Abundia or Habonde.

Acadine

A magic fountain in Sicily. At times, identified as Acadine.

Acavisr

An Etruscan deity, one of the Lasae. In some lore, occasionally known as Acavisr, Achvistr or Achvistr.

Acca Larentia

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Accius Naevius

An augur. He is said to have cut through a whetstone with a razor. On occassion, called Accius Naevius.

Achilleis

An unfinished poem by Statius about the life of Achilles. In some references, called Achilleis.

Acron

A king. He led the first attack on Rome in an effort to recover the Sabine women taken captive by Romulus. Identified as Acron.

Adephagia

A goddess of good cheer, gluttony. On occassion, referred to as Adephagia.

Aemilia

A vestal virgin. In some references, called Aemilia.

Aemilia Pudentilla

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Aeneas Silvius

King of Alba Longa. A descendant of Aeneas. Also commonly identified as Aeneas Silvius.

Aeneid

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Aequitas

The god of equity. In some lore, occasionally identified as Aequitas.

Aesculapius

The Roman version of Asclepius. In some references, referred to as Aesculapius, Esculapius, Esculapius or Asclepius.

Aeternitas

Eternity personified. This being is depicted as the ouroboros or the phoenix. On occassion, known as Aeternitas.

Africus

A wind from the south-west quarter. Also called Africus, Greek Lips or Greek Lips.

Agonium

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Agrama

A festival for women at which the effigy of a male was destroyed. Sometimes referred to as Agrama.

Agrippina

Wife of Germanicus. Mother of Agrippina, Caligula and Drusilla. On occassion, known as Agrippina.

Agrippine Sibyl

A mediaeval prophetess. Called Agrippine Sibyl.

Aidoneus

A name for Hades. Also commonly known as Aidoneus, Hades, Hades, Pluteus, Aides, Ais, Clymenus, Euboleus, Eubouteous, Klymenos, Plouton, Pluto, Polydectes, Polydegmon, Pylartes, Stygeros, 'unseen', Zeus Katachthonios, Egyptian Serapis, Japanese Emma-O, Norse Ymir, Pacific Islands Yamaraja, Persian Yima, Roman Aidoneus, Dis (Pater), Dives or Orcus.

Aius Locutius

A personification of the voice said to have warned the Romans of the coming of the Gauls. Also commonly referred to as Aius Locutius.

Alannus

A Celtic messenger god in Gaul. Sometimes referred to as Alannus, Alaunus, Alaunus, Alounis, Alounis, Alaenis, Alaenis, Roman Mercury, Roman Mercury, Artaius, Hermes or Lugh.

Alban Kings

Mythical kings said to rule before Romulus and Remus. At times, called Alban Kings.

albogaleus

The lower part of the headdress of the flamen. Dialus. This was said to be made from the skins of those sacrificed to Jupiter. Occasionally known as albogaleus.

Albunea

An Italian water nymph. She had the gift of prophecy and some of her pronouncements were recorded in the Sibylline Books. Also commonly referred to as Albunea, Diana, Diana, Albunea, Dian, Diane, Dian(e), Dione, Jana, Lucina, Czech Devana, Greek Artemis, Polish Dziewona, Serbian Dilwica or Hecate.

Alcmon

A minor god. Father of Lara. In some accounts, referred to as Alcmon.

Alemona

A goddess of childbirth and passage. Occasionally referred to as Alemona.

Altor

An ancient god. Known as Altor, 'feeder' or 'feeder'.

Amata

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Ambarvalia

The festival of the crops in late May. In some references, identified as Ambarvalia.

Ambisagrus

A Celtic god in Gaul. Occasionally known as Ambisagrus.

Amoretti

Minor love gods. Occasionally known as Amoretti, Greek Erotes or Greek Erotes.

Amorini

Small love gods. In some lore, occasionally identified as Amorini.

Amulius

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Amyas

A love-god. In some lore, occasionally known as Amyas.

ancile

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Ancus Marcius

A legendary king of Rome. At times, identified as Ancus Marcius.

Androcles

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Angerona

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Angeronalia

The festival in honour of Angerona, 21 December. Also identified as Angeronalia, Divalia or Divalia.

Angitia

A goddess of healing. In some accounts there are several such deities, the Angitiae. Others identify her with Fauna. At times, called Angitia, Anagtia or Anagtia.

Ani

An Etruscan sky-god. He is sometimes depicted as having two faces. Also referred to as Ani, Ala, Ala, Ale, Ani, Ale or Ana.

anima

In the theory of the threefold soul, the part that returned to the gods. Sometimes identified as anima.

Anna Larentia

An obscure deity. Sometimes identified as Anna Larentia.

Anna Perenna

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Anona

The goddess of crops. Sometimes known as Anona, Annona or Annona.

Anthor

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Apellun

An Italic love-god. Also called Apellun, Apellon, Apellon, Apollo, Greek Apollo, Greek Apollo, Angus Og, Aplu, Atepomarus, Maponus, Surya or Veiovis.

Aplu

An Etruscan weather-god. In some references, known as Aplu, Greek Apollo, Greek Apollo, Angus Og, Apellun, Atepomarus, Maponus, Surya or Veiovis.

Apone

A fountain in Padua said to have healing qualities. Sometimes identified as Apone.

Appiades

5 goddesses of peace. These deities, represented on horseback, were Concordia, Pallas, Peace, Venus and Vesta. Also referred to as Appiades, Venus, Venus, Genetrix, Victrix, Cloacina, Dione, Felix, Hesper, Libentina, Libitina, Queen of Love, Vesper, Victrix; Greek Aphrodite or Charis.

Aprodita

The Italic goddess of love. In some references, known as Aprodita, Greek Aphrodite, Greek Aphrodite, Alilat, Anahit, Anahita, Anaitis, Aphrodisias, Argimpasa, Astarte, Biducht, Caelestis, Concordia, Hathor, Ishtar, Mylitta, Rati, Syrian Goddess or Turan.

Apuleius, Lucius

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Aquilo

The north wind. In some references, called Aquilo, Aquilon, Aquilon, Septentrio, Septentrio, Greek Boreas or Greek Boreas.

Archagathius

A legendary physician renowned for his. Cruel methods of surgery. Sometimes identified as Archagathius, Vulnerarius, Vulnerarius or Archagathus.

Arimanius

The Roman name for Ahriman. Sometimes called Arimanius.

Armilustrium

A festival in honour of Mars, held in October. Occasionally referred to as Armilustrium.

Arruns

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Artepomaros

A name for Belinus as 'owner of a great horse'. Sometimes known as Artepomaros, Belinus, Belinus, Bel, Belenos, Belenus, Belin, Bellinus, Lord of Therapy, Bel, Irish Bilé, Roman Apollo, Shakespeare Cymbeline or Welsh Beli Mawr.

Arval Brothers

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Ashi

A goddess of recompense and, later, of morality. Referred to as Ashi.

Ass god

A deity connected with the feast of Saturnalia. Referred to as Ass god.

Atunis

The Etruscan version of Adonis. Also called Atunis.

augur

One who made prophecies from the flight of birds. Known as augur, auspex or auspex.

Augusta

A name for the goddess Epona, used. By the Romans. Sometimes called Augusta, Justitia, Justitia, Augusta, Dike, Iustitia or Greek Dike.

Aulus Vibenna

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aurea virga

A rod, the caduceus given by Mercury to Apollo. Also commonly called aurea virga, caduceus, caduceus, kerykeion, Greek kerykeion or virga medicinus.

Aurora

A goddess of the dawn. At times, referred to as Aurora, Mater Matuta, Mater Matuta, Eos, Ino, Matuta or Greek Eos.

Auster

The south west wind personified. Referred to as Auster, Greek Notus or Greek Notus.

Aventinus

A son of Heracles and Rhea. He fought with Turnus against Aeneas. Called Aventinus.

Avernal

A fiend: inhabitant of the underworld. Also commonly identified as Avernal.

Avernus

Hell or the entrance to it. In some lore, occasionally referred to as Avernus, Lake Avernus, Lake Avernus or Avernus.

Averruncus

A minor god whose function was to avert evil. A version of Robigus. Sometimes called Averruncus, Robigus, Robigus or Robigo.

Bacax

A local god in North Africa. In some lore, occasionally identified as Bacax.

bacchanal

A follower of Bacchus. A priest(ess) of Bacchus. A song, etc. dedicated to Bacchus. In some accounts, known as bacchanal, bacchante or bacchante.

Bacchanalia

Orgiastic festivals in honour of Bacchus. In some lore, occasionally referred to as Bacchanalia, Bacchanals, Bacchanals or bacchantes.

bacchant

A devotee of Bacchus. A priest of Bacchus. Also referred to as bacchant, Bacchoi, Bacchoi, plurbacchoi or plurbacchoi.

bacchantes

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Bacchus

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Battle of Lake Regillus

A battle in which the Romans, with the help of Castor and Pollux, defeated. The Latins. Also commonly referred to as Battle of Lake Regillus.

Bellona

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Berenice

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Biston

A son of Mars. Also called Biston.

Bona Capia

A goddess of plenty. At times, referred to as Bona Capia.

Bona Dea

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borax

A stone, an antidote to poison, believed to be carried in its head by a toad. In some lore, occasionally identified as borax.

Brutus

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Bubona

Goddess of cattle. At times, referred to as Bubona.

Bussumarus

A Celtic god known on the Continent. Sometimes called Bussumarus, Roman Jupiter, Roman Jupiter, Ambres, Amen, Dyaus, Jessis or Tinia.

Cacus

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Caduceator

A name for Mercury as 'owner of the caduceus'. Also commonly called Caduceator.

caduceus

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Caecilia

Tanaquil]. Wife of Tarquinius Priscus. She was an Etruscan sorceress who, when her husband Lucumo became king of Rome, was called Tanaquil. Sometimes called Caecilia, Gaea Caecilia, Gaea Caecilia, Gaia Caecilia or Gaia Caecilia.

Caeculus

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Caeles Vibenna

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Caelestis

A moon-goddess. Juno as the 'guardian of Carthage'. On occassion, known as Caelestis, Juno Caelestis, Juno Caelestis, Carthaginian Tanit, Carthaginian Tanit, Greek Aphrodite, Greek Aphrodite, Alilat, Anahit, Anahita, Anaitis, Aphrodisias, Aprodita, Argimpasa, Astarte, Biducht, Concordia, Hathor, Ishtar, Mylitta, Rati, Syrian Goddess or Turan.

Caelus

The sky personified. Consort of Tellus. Also commonly known as Caelus, Coelus, Coelus, Uranus, Greek Uranus, Greek Uranus, Dyaus, Ouranos, Phoenician Baal-Samin or Phoenician Baal-Samin.

Caligula

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Camenae

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Camilla

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Camise

Wife of Janus. Mother of Tiberius. Other versions give Jana as the wife of Janus. At times, known as Camise.

Campestres

Celtic guardian spirits of military matters. Also known as Campestres.

Campus Martius

The training ground, near Rome, for young soldiers, devotees of Mars. Sometimes identified as Campus Martius, Field of Mars or Field of Mars.

Candamius

A sky-god in Spain. Also called Candamius.

Candelifera

A goddess of birth. Also called Candelifera.

Canens

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Canidia

A witch who cast spells using wax dolls. Sometimes called Canidia.

Capetus

A king of Alba Longa. Father of Tiberinus, some say. At times, known as Capetus.

Capitol

The temple of Jupiter. On occassion, called Capitol.

Capys

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Car

A god. Some say he invented the art of augury. In some references, known as Car.

Cardea

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Carmenta

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Carmentalia

A festival in honour of Carmenta, held in January. Also commonly called Carmentalia.

Carna

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Castores

The Roman name for the Dioscuri. In some references, known as Castores.

Catamitus

The Latin name for Ganymede. In some accounts, referred to as Catamitus.

Celer

A lieutenant of Romulus. In some accounts it was Celer, not Romulus, who killed Remus for jumping over the wall of the new city. Also referred to as Celer.

Cerealia

A festival in honour of Ceres held on 19 April. Occasionally identified as Cerealia, Ceralia, Ceralia, Ludi Cerialis or Ludi Cerialis.

Ceres

Goddess of agriculture and corn. Daughter of Saturn and Ops. A consort of Jupiter. Mother of Proserpina. On occassion, identified as Ceres, Cybele, Cybele, Agdistis, Cybebe, Cybelle, Idaea, Kubele, Kybebe, Kybele, Lion-and-bee Goddess, Maia, Great Mother, Meter Dindymene, White Goddess, Gaulish Berecynthia, Greek Demeter, Idaea, Idaean Mother, Rhea, Roman Bona Dea, Magna Mater, Maia, Mater Turrita, Ops, Sumerian Inanna or Syrian Kubaba.

Charun

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Cileus

An Etruscan deity. At times, called Cileus.

Cincinnatus

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Cinxia

A goddess of marriage, later. Assimilated into Juno. Sometimes identified as Cinxia, Juno, Juno, Capritona, Covella, Jugalis, Domiduca, Great Goddess, Huga, Iuno, Iterduca, Jugalia, Lucina, Opigina, Pronuba, Queen of Heaven, Sispes, Sororia, Etruscan Uni, Greek Hera or Ilithyia.

Circius

A wind from the north-west quarter. Also identified as Circius, Greek Thracius or Greek Thracius.

Claudia Quinta

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Clementia

A guardian-goddess of the citizen. On occassion, called Clementia.

Cloacina

Goddess of sewers. A name for Venus as 'purifier'. Also commonly identified as Cloacina, Venus, Venus, Genetrix, Victrix, Appiades, Dione, Felix, Hesper, Libentina, Libitina, Queen of Love, Vesper, Victrix; Greek Aphrodite or Charis.

Cloelia

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Clusivius

A name of Janus as 'closer of gates'. At times, known as Clusivius, Janus, Janus, Dianus, Dionus, Ianus, Patulcius, Consuvius or Janus Bifrons.

Commodus

A 2nd C. Roman emperor. He declared himself a god (Hercules the Second) and required his subjects to worship him. Also commonly called Commodus, Hercules secundus, Hercules secundus, Hercules Secundus or Hercules Secundus.

Compitalis

A festival of the cross-roads. Sometimes identified as Compitalis.

Comus

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Concordia

A goddess of civic agreement, one of the 5 Appiades. Occasionally referred to as Concordia, Greek Aphrodite, Greek Aphrodite, Alilat, Anahit, Anahita, Anaitis, Aphrodisias, Aprodita, Argimpasa, Astarte, Biducht, Caelestis, Hathor, Ishtar, Mylitta, Rati, Syrian Goddess, Turan, Homonoia or Homonoia.

Consentes

The Roman version of Pan. At times, identified as Consentes, Pan, Pan or Capricorn.

Consentes Dii

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Consualia

Festivals in honour of Consus held on 19 or 21 August and 15 December. At times, known as Consualia.

Consus

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Consuvius

A name for Janus as 'the guardian of the beginning of human life'. Occasionally called Consuvius, Janus, Janus, Dianus, Dionus, Ianus, Patulcius, Clusivius or Janus Bifrons.

Convector

A god of grain and granaries. On occassion, known as Convector.

Coriolanus

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Corus

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Corvus, Marcius

A military tribune. He fought a giant in single combat and was helped by a raven that flew into the face of his opponent. At times, referred to as Corvus, Marcius.

Cranae

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Cuba

A guardian goddess of infants in their cots. At times, called Cuba.

Culsu

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Cunina

A goddess of babies. Called Cunina.

Cupid

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Cupra

An Etruscan fertility-goddess. In some accounts, called Cupra.

Curiatii

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Curtius

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Cybele Magna Mater

The goddess Cybele as 'great mother' in the Roman pantheon. Identified as Cybele Magna Mater.

Damatar

An Italic corn goddess. Also commonly known as Damatar, Greek Demeter, Greek Demeter, Ceres, Cybele or Dea Dia.

Damocles

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Daunus

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Dea Caelistis

A goddess. Also known as Dea Caelistis, British Briganta or British Briganta.

Dea Dia

An ancient corn goddess. Occasionally identified as Dea Dia, Demeter, Demeter, Amphictyonis, Da-Meter, Damater, Deo, Doso, Good Goddess, Grain Mother, Hermione, Isis, Mangata, Mother Da, Thesmophorus, Three Eponae, Achaiva, Black Demeter, Chloe, Da-meter, Deo, Epona, Erinys, Ga Metre, Ge Metre Gemeter, Hermione, Mother Earth, Thesmorphorus, White Goddess, Egyptian Isis, Italic Damatar, Phrygian Cybele, Roman Ceres, Greek Demeter, Greek Demeter, Ceres, Cybele or Damatar.

Dea Quartana

A goddess of fever. Daughter of Febris. Sister of Dea Tertiana. Also commonly identified as Dea Quartana.

Dea Tertiana

A goddess of fever. Daughter of Febris. Sister of Dea Quartana. Also known as Dea Tertiana.

Decuma

A goddess of birth. One of the 3 Parcae. In some accounts, known as Decuma, Decima or Decima.

Deipara

Mother of god: god-bearing. On occassion, called Deipara, Greek Theotikos or Greek Theotikos.

Demaratus

A Greek who emigrated to northern Italy. Father of Lucumo. Occasionally called Demaratus.

Dercetius

A Spanish mountain god. Referred to as Dercetius.

deus

The Latin word for god. In some references, known as deus, Greek Theos or Greek Theos.

Deverra

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Di Indigetes

Heroes who were deified at death. On occassion, known as Di Indigetes.

Di Mauri

The gods of the North African Moors. In some lore, occasionally called Di Mauri.

Di patrii

Ancestral gods: traditional gods. In some lore, occasionally identified as Di patrii.

Di Superi

Gods of the sky. At times, identified as Di Superi, Greek Uranian Deities or Greek Uranian Deities.

Diana

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Diana of Ephesus

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Dione

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Diovis-pater

An early name for Jupiter. Sometimes known as Diovis-pater, Diovis or Diovis.

Dirae

The Roman version of the Furies. On occassion, known as Dirae, Furiae, Furiae or Furies.

Dis

The Etruscan god of the dead: the underworld itself. Sometimes identified as Dis, Orcus, Orcus, Dis, Dis Pater, Hades, Horcos, Horkos, Mors, Thanatos, Greek Hades or Phorcis.

Dis Pater

A Celtic god of the underworld in Gaul. Also referred to as Dis Pater, Dispater, Dispater, Dives, Dives, Donn, Donn, sacred plants, sacred plants, sacred trees, tree-worship, Asclepius Phrygeus Muslims, Romans Dionysus Mercury Kojin Apollo Ceres and Demeter Dis Pater, Hades Artemis Egypt Dionysus, Pacific Islands Romulus Cybele Hestia Dionysus Dionysus Apollo Hera Buddha, Egypt Hades Aphrodite, Venus Demeter, Hades Egypt Baal, Jupiter, Melkarth, Thor, Zeus Athena Hermes Mexico Confucius, Dionysus Dionysus Heracles Demeter, Hades Japan Buddhism Japan Egypt Sweden Dionysus Mithra Greece, tree worship, Wealthy Father, Wealthy Father, Divs, Divs, Greek Hades, Greek Hades, Orcus, Pluto, She'ol, Yama, Yama-Raja, Pluto, Pluto or Thanatos.

Disciplina

A minor goddess. On occassion, called Disciplina.

Discordia

The goddess of mischief. She was the owner of a ring that conferred invisibility on the wearer. In some references, identified as Discordia, Greek Eris or Greek Eris.

Domiduca

A name for Juno as 'guardian goddess of babies when out of their. Parents. Sight'. Known as Domiduca, Juno, Juno, Capritona, Covella, Jugalis, Cinxia, Great Goddess, Huga, Iuno, Iterduca, Jugalia, Lucina, Opigina, Pronuba, Queen of Heaven, Sispes, Sororia, Etruscan Uni, Greek Hera or Ilithyia.

Dominae

A Celtic river-goddess of the Loire. Occasionally known as Dominae.

Drusilla

Daughter of Germanicus and Agrippina. Sister of Caligula. She is said to have committed incest with Caligula who deified her on her death. Also identified as Drusilla.

Duillae

Spanish fertility goddesses. Also referred to as Duillae.

Edusha

A god of children. Referred to as Edusha.

Egeria

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Elagabalus

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Enariae

Dog-priests. In some lore, occasionally identified as Enariae.

Endouellicus

A Portuguese god of healing. At times, identified as Endouellicus.

Epona

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Equina

A festival in honour of Mars. Also known as Equina.

Equus October

A festival in honour of Mars held on October 15th. In some references, identified as Equus October, Ecus October or Ecus October.

Erichtho

A sorceress. Soon after Virgil died, Erichtho sent him to the underworld to retrieve a soul. Sometimes referred to as Erichtho.

Evan

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Fabulinus

God whose job it was to teach children to speak. Occasionally referred to as Fabulinus, Vagitanus, Vagitanus, Vagtanus or Vagtanus.

Fama

The 100-tongued goddess of rumour. In some references, referred to as Fama, Greek Pheme or Greek Pheme.

Fascinius

A fertility-god. Referred to as Fascinius.

Fasti

A story by Ovid including an account of the rape of Lucretia. Known as Fasti.

Fata Scribendi

A goddess (or goddesses) who wrote. Out the fate of each child at birth. In some accounts, they are the same as the Fates. Occasionally identified as Fata Scribendi.

Fatae Devones

Goddesses of the oak wood. Occasionally known as Fatae Devones, Matronae Devones or Matronae Devones.

Fatus

A god of personal destiny. At times, referred to as Fatus.

faun

Part man, part goat: a woodland. Spirit: a descendant of Faunus. Also commonly identified as faun, Faunus, Faunus, Fatu(cl)us, Faun, Incubo, In(n)uus, Lupercus, Silvan, plurFauni, Greek Pan or Faunus.

Fauna

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Faunus

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Faustulus

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Favonius

The west wind personified. Consort of Flora, some say. In some lore, occasionally called Favonius, Greek Zephyr or Greek Zephyr.

Feast of Anna Perenna

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Febris

A goddess of fevers. Mother of Dea Quartana and Dea. Tertiana. Identified as Febris, Quartana, Quartana, Tertiana or Tertiana.

Februs

The god of the dead. Occasionally referred to as Februs, Etruscan Dis, Etruscan Dis, Greek Pluto, Greek Pluto or Dis.

Felicitas

The goddess of good luck. On occassion, referred to as Felicitas, Fortuna, Fortuna, Primagenia, Greek Tyche or Italian Fors (Fortuna).

Felix

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Feralia

The final festival of the dead, held in February. In some references, identified as Feralia.

Feronia

An Etruscan fertility-goddess and goddess of fire. On occassion, identified as Feronia.

Fessonia

A goddess helping the needy. In some accounts, referred to as Fessonia.

Festus

A festival held in honour of Mercury, held on May 15th. In some lore, occasionally called Festus.

Fides

A goddess, fidelity personified. She wore only a white veil. Also commonly identified as Fides.

Fidius

A name for Jupiter as god of good. Faith and contracts. Sometimes called Fidius, Deus Fides, Deus Fides, Fides, Fides Publica, Dius Fidius, Dius Fidius, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunderbearer, Thunder-darter, Thunder-master, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon, Greek Zeus, Deus (Publica) Fides, Deus (Publica) Fides, Greek Zeus Pistios, Greek Zeus Pistios, Sancus, Sabine Sancus or Sabine Sancus.

flamen

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flamen Ceralia

A priest of Ceres. In some references, called flamen Ceralia.

flamen Dialis

A priest of Jupiter. In some lore, occasionally called flamen Dialis.

flamen Florialis

A priest of Flora. Sometimes known as flamen Florialis.

flamen Furrinalis

A priest of Furrina. In some references, referred to as flamen Furrinalis.

flamen Martialis

A priest of Mars. Occasionally referred to as flamen Martialis.

flamen Pomonatis

A priest of Pomona. In some references, called flamen Pomonatis.

flamen Portumnatis

A priest of Portumnus. Occasionally identified as flamen Portumnatis.

flamen Quirinalis

A priest of Quirinus. Occasionally referred to as flamen Quirinalis.

flamen Vulcanatis

A priest of Vulcanus. In some lore, occasionally referred to as flamen Vulcanatis.

flaminica

The wife of a flamen. Also identified as flaminica.

flaminica Dialis

Wife of the flamen Dialis who helped. Her husband in his priestly duties. Also identified as flaminica Dialis.

flaminium

The office of a flamen. At times, identified as flaminium.

Flora

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Floralia

A festival in honour of Flora held in April/May. In some lore, occasionally known as Floralia.

Fons

A god of springs. Son of Faunus and Juturna. Also commonly referred to as Fons, Fontus or Fontus.

Fontinalia

A festival in honour of the god Fons, which involves the dressing of fountains and springs, held on October 13th. Occasionally known as Fontinalia.

Fordicidia

A festival in honour of Tellus held on April 15th at which a cow and a calf. Were sacrificed. Occasionally called Fordicidia.

Fornacalia

An ancient festival in honour of Fornax or Vulcanus, deities of furnaces or ovens. Also called Fornacalia.

Fornax

A guardian goddess of ovens and baking. An aspect of Vesta. In some accounts, called Fornax, Vesta, Vesta or Greek Hestia.

Fortuna

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Fortuna Virginensis

The goddess Fortuna as guardian of newly-married women. In some lore, occasionally known as Fortuna Virginensis.

Fortuna Virilis

The goddess Fortuna acting to preserve. The beauty of women so that they. Retained the favour of their husbands. Occasionally known as Fortuna Virilis.

Frugifer

A name for Baal-Hammon. As 'fruit-bearer'. In some references, called Frugifer.

Fulgans

A name of Jupiter as 'lightning-wielder'. Called Fulgans, Fulgar, Fulgar or Jupiter.

fulgur

The thunderbolt of Jupiter. Sometimes called fulgur.

Fulguriator

A priest whose function was to interpret the meaning of thunderbolts. Occasionally called Fulguriator.

Furrina

A minor goddess. Some identify her with the Furies, others as a spirit of darkness. On occassion, known as Furrina, Furina or Furina.

Furrinalia

A festival in honour of Furrina, July 25th. Also commonly identified as Furrinalia.

Gelasinus

A god of laughter. Occasionally identified as Gelasinus.

Genealogiae

A collection of myths by Hyginus. In some accounts, known as Genealogiae, Fabulae or Fabulae.

genius

A guardian spirit of the individual man, often in the form of a winged youth. Occasionally referred to as genius, femalejuno, femalejuno, plurgenii, plurgenii, Greek daimon or Greek daimon.

genius Cuaillatus

An attendant (sometimes 3) on the Mother Goddess. On occassion, referred to as genius Cuaillatus, plurgenii Cuaillati or plurgenii Cuaillati.

genius loci

The guardian spirit of a place, often in the form of a serpent. On occassion, referred to as genius loci.

Germanicus

A Roman general. Husband of Agrippina. Father of Agrippina, Caligula and Drusilla. Occasionally identified as Germanicus.

Gradivus

A name for Mars as leader of the Roman forces in battle. At times, called Gradivus, Mars, Mars, Ares, Mamers, Marmar, Mavors, Pyrois, sacred birds, Viticus, Father Mars, Loucetius, Ma(r)spiter, Pyrois, Quirinus, Rigonometis, Silvan, Ultor, Egyptian Anhur, Etruscan Maris, Greek Ares or Vitricos.

Gratiae

The Roman version of the Graces. Sometimes known as Gratiae.

Gravidus

A name of Mars as leader of the Roman legions in battle. Identified as Gravidus, Greek Ares, Greek Ares, Anhur, Gradivus, Karttikeya, Maris, Mars, Nergal or Skanda.

Hamavehae

3 Celtic mother-goddesses of Germany. Also identified as Hamavehae.

Hecate

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herba sacra

A plant said to have magic properties to cure sickness and avert witchcraft. Sometimes referred to as herba sacra, Verbenalia, Verbenalia, vervain or vervain.

Hereklo

An Italian hero. Sometimes known as Hereklo, Greek Heracles, Greek Heracles, Arsaphes, Baal Tyre, Gisdhubar, Khons, Krishna, Melkarth, Vahagn, Verethragna, Vritrahana, Roman Hercules, Roman Hercules or Heracles.

Hermus

A river-god. At times, identified as Hermus.

Heroides

A book of poems, addressed to the heroines of Greek and Roman myths, written by Ovid. Also called Heroides, Heroines or Heroines.

Hersilia

Wife of Romulus. She was taken up to heaven after the death of her husband and became one of the Horae. Occasionally called Hersilia.

Hilaria

A festival celebrating the reunion of Attis and Cybele. Also referred to as Hilaria.

Honus

A god (or goddess in some accounts) of military honours. Sometimes identified as Honus, Honos or Honos.

Hora

A goddess. Consort of Quirinus. Occasionally referred to as Hora, Hora Quirini or Hora Quirini.

Horatia

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Horatii

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Horatius

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Horta

An Etruscan goddess of agriculture. Called Horta.

Hostia

An Etruscan goddess. Also identified as Hostia.

household gods

Gods of the family, lares and penates. Occasionally known as household gods.

Hula

An early Italian vegetation deity. Occasionally referred to as Hula.

Hulus

An early Italian vegetation deity. In some lore, occasionally identified as Hulus, Hula, Hula, Hula or Hula.

Hyginus

A 1st C. Mythographer. He was a former Spanish slave who wrote a handbook of mythology, Genealogiae or Fabulae. In some accounts, referred to as Hyginus.

Icauna

A Celtic river-goddess in Gaul. On occassion, identified as Icauna.

Icilius

A man betrothed to Verginia. In some references, referred to as Icilius.

Ifru

A North African god. Also called Ifru.

Iguvine Tablets

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Ilithyia-Leucothea

An Etruscan fertility-goddess. In some accounts, identified as Ilithyia-Leucothea.

Imperator

A name for Jupiter as 'supreme leader'. Also identified as Imperator, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunderbearer, Thunder-darter, Thunder-master, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon or Greek Zeus.

Imporcitor

A god of agriculture. Also known as Imporcitor.

Incitatus

The horse of Caligula. The emperor appointed this animal to be a consul and priest. Sometimes called Incitatus.

Indiges

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Inferi

Gods and inhabitants of the underworld. At times, identified as Inferi, Superi or Superi.

inferiae

Offerings to the spirits of the dead. Sometimes referred to as inferiae.

inferni

Spirits of the departed. In some accounts, called inferni.

infernus

Hell. Occasionally identified as infernus.

Innuus

A fertility-god, god of shepherds. In some accounts, he is equated with Faunus as 'fertiliser'. Also identified as Innuus, Inuus or Inuus.

Intercidona

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Invictus

A name of Jupiter as 'invincible'. Occasionally known as Invictus, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunderbearer, Thunder-darter, Thunder-master, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon or Greek Zeus.

Invidia

A god of envy. Also known as Invidia, Greek Phthonus or Greek Phthonus.

Iterduca

A goddess of brides. Her function was to introduce a bride to her new home. She was later assimilated into Juno. At times, identified as Iterduca, Juno, Juno, Capritona, Covella, Jugalis, Cinxia, Domiduca, Great Goddess, Huga, Iuno, Jugalia, Lucina, Opigina, Pronuba, Queen of Heaven, Sispes, Sororia, Etruscan Uni, Greek Hera or Ilithyia.

Iulus

King of Latium. Son of Ascanius. Brother of Silvius. He was forced from the throne and banished by Silvius. Occasionally called Iulus, Ascanius, Ascanius, Askaneios, Ilus, Iulus or Ilus.

Jana

Wife of Janus. Some versions identify Jana with Diana. In some lore, occasionally called Jana, Diana, Diana, Albunea, Dian, Diane, Albunea, Dian(e), Dione, Lucina, Czech Devana, Greek Artemis, Polish Dziewona, Serbian Dilwica or Hecate.

januae

Cakes forming part of offerings to the god Janus. Occasionally referred to as januae.

Janus

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Janus Bifrons`

A name for Janus as two-faced. On occassion, called Janus Bifrons`.

Janus Quadrifrons

A four-headed version of Janus. In some references, identified as Janus Quadrifrons.

Juno

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juno

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Juno Capritona

A title of Juno used at the festival of Nonae Capritonae. Also commonly referred to as Juno Capritona.

Juno Covella

A name used to address Juno at new. Moon ceremonies. Sometimes known as Juno Covella.

Juno Curitis

A name for Juno as a war-goddess and guardian of cities. Sometimes referred to as Juno Curitis, Juno Quiritis, Juno Quiritis or Juno Cuiritis.

Juno Lucina

A name of Juno as the goddess of childbirth who caused the child to see. Sometimes identified as Juno Lucina, Lucina, Lucina, Diana, Ilithyia, Juno, Diana or Greek Ilithyia.

Juno Moneta

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Juno Natalis

A name of Juno as patron of birthdays. Also commonly referred to as Juno Natalis.

Juno Pronuba

A name of Juno as guardian of marriages. Also known as Juno Pronuba.

Juno Regina

A name of Juno as queen of goddesses. Also called Juno Regina.

Juno Sororia

Juno as the guardian goddess of girls. At the age of puberty. On occassion, known as Juno Sororia.

Juno Sospita

Juno as the guardian of women in danger, later of the state. Identified as Juno Sospita.

Juno Virginensis

A name for Juno as guardian of maidens, Chastity. Also known as Juno Virginensis.

Junones

Protective goddesses. In some accounts, known as Junones, juno, juno, ionones, iuno, plurionones, junones or malegenius.

Junonian bird

The peacock. Also identified as Junonian bird, peacock or peacock.

Jupiter

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Jupiter Ammon

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Jupiter Capitolinus

A name for Jupiter as protector of Rome. Also known as Jupiter Capitolinus, Jupiter Tarpeius or Jupiter Tarpeius.

Jupiter Dolichenus

A name of Jupiter taking the place of the Hittite god, Taru, in the Syrian empire. In some references, identified as Jupiter Dolichenus.

Jupiter Feretrius

Jupiter as the god of the sacred oak. In some references, identified as Jupiter Feretrius.

Jupiter Fidius

A name for Jupiter as guardian of the land. On occassion, referred to as Jupiter Fidius.

Jupiter Fulgurator

A name of Jupiter as god of lightning. In some accounts, referred to as Jupiter Fulgurator, Jupiter Elicius, Jupiter Elicius, Jupiter Fulminator or Jupiter Fulminator.

Jupiter Imperator

A name for Jupiter as ruler. On occassion, called Jupiter Imperator.

Jupiter Invictus

A name for Jupiter as unconquerable. Also referred to as Jupiter Invictus.

Jupiter Latiaris

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Jupiter Lucerius

Jupiter as one who lives in the shiny heaven. Called Jupiter Lucerius, Jupiter Lucesius or Jupiter Lucesius.

Jupiter Opikulus

A name for Jupiter as helper. Sometimes referred to as Jupiter Opikulus.

Jupiter Optimus Maximus

Jupiter as the all-powerful guardian of Rome. Also commonly called Jupiter Optimus Maximus.

Jupiter Pluvialis

A name for Jupiter as god of rain. Sometimes identified as Jupiter Pluvialis, Pluvius, Pluvius or Jupiter.

Jupiter Praedator

Jupiter as one who takes and gives booty. Also called Jupiter Praedator.

Jupiter Serenator

Jupiter as god of calm skies. In some accounts, called Jupiter Serenator.

Jupiter Stator

Jupiter as the god of battle. In this role, Jupiter prevented combatants from deserting their fellows. Also known as Jupiter Stator, 'supporter' or 'supporter'.

Jupiter Terminus

Jupiter as a god of boundaries. In some lore, occasionally called Jupiter Terminus.

Jupiter Tonans

Jupiter as a god of thunder. Sometimes referred to as Jupiter Tonans, Tonitrualis or Tonitrualis.

Jupiter Triumphator

Jupiter as the giver of victory. In some references, referred to as Jupiter Triumphator.

Jupiter Victor

Jupiter as conqueror. Identified as Jupiter Victor.

Justitia

A goddess, justice personified. She is depicted blindfolded and holding the scales of justice. Known as Justitia, Augusta, Augusta, Dike, Dike, Dice, Roman Augusta, Iustitia, Iustitia, Greek Dike or Greek Dike.

Juturna

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Juturnalia

A festival, held on January 11th, in honour of Juturna. In some lore, occasionally identified as Juturnalia.

Juventas

Goddess of youth. Cupbearer to the gods. In some references, known as Juventas, Iuventas, Iuventas, Juventus, Juventus, Greek Hebe, Greek Hebe or Varuni.

Karnos

An ancient god assimilated to Apollo. Also referred to as Karnos, Karneios or Karneios.

King of Saturnalia

A man impersonating the god Saturn. After five days in office, the incumbent was killed. In some accounts, referred to as King of Saturnalia, Abbot of Unreason, Abbot of Unreason or King of Unreason.

King of the Wood

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Lactantius

A 2nd or 3rd C. Writer, generally regarded as the author of the poem Phoenix. At times, referred to as Lactantius.

Lactanus

A god of agriculture. Also commonly identified as Lactanus, Lactans or Lactans.

lamb

The animal of Juno. Occasionally known as lamb.

Lapis Manalis

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Lar

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Lar Familiaris

A household god, a guardian spirit of an ancestor of the family. In some accounts, known as Lar Familiaris.

Lara

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Larentalia

The feast of the dead in honour of Acca Larentia, 23rd December. Also known as Larentalia.

Lares

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Lares praestiles

Guardian gods of the state. In some lore, occasionally called Lares praestiles.

Lares viales

Guardian gods of the cross-roads. Also commonly identified as Lares viales.

Lars Porsena

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Larunda

A minor goddess of the Sabines. In some accounts, she is identified with Lara. On occassion, known as Larunda, Lara, Lara, Mania or 'babbler'.

larva

An evil spirit: a form of Lemur. Known as larva, larvae, larvae, lemur, lemur, lemures, plurlemures, Greek lamyroi, lares, plurallarvae or plurallarvae.

Lasae

Minor Etruscan female deities or supernatural beings. In some references, referred to as Lasae.

Latinus

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Latona

A mother-goddess and moon-goddess. Mother of Apollo and Diana by Jupiter. Sometimes identified as Latona, Greek Leto, Greek Leto or Edjo.

lectisternium

A meal for the gods. In some references, called lectisternium, Greek theoxenia or Greek theoxenia.

lemur

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Lemuria

A festival commemorating the dead, May 9-15th. On occassion, identified as Lemuria.

Leucetios

A Celtic thunder-god in Gaul. Identified as Leucetios.

Levana

A tutelary goddess of new-born. Babies. In some references, identified as Levana.

Liber

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Libera

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Liberalia

A festival in honour of Liber held on March 17th. In some lore, occasionally known as Liberalia.

Liberalitas

A god of generosity. Referred to as Liberalitas.

Libertas

A goddess of personal liberty. Sometimes known as Libertas.

Libertina

A name for Venus as the goddess of sensual pleasures. In some lore, occasionally referred to as Libertina, Libitina, Libitina, Venus or Greek Persephone.

Libitina

A goddess of funerals and the underworld, death personified. An aspect of Venus. Sometimes referred to as Libitina, Libertina, Libertina, Venus, Venus, Genetrix, Victrix, Appiades, Cloacina, Dione, Felix, Hesper, Libentina, Queen of Love, Vesper, Victrix; Greek Aphrodite, Charis, Greek Persephone or Greek Persephone.

Licinia

A vestal virgin. She was condemned to death for incest. In some references, referred to as Licinia.

lily

The flower of Juno. Occasionally referred to as lily.

lituus

An augur's staff. This staff, hooked at one end, was used to mark out the area to be used for divination. Also called lituus.

Losna

An Etruscan moon-goddess. In some accounts, referred to as Losna.

Lua

An ancient Italian goddess of destruction. The first consort of Saturn. In some references, known as Lua, Lua Mater, Lua Mater, Lua Saturni or Lua Saturni.

Lucifer

Venus as the morning star. Sometimes called Lucifer, Light-bearer, Light-bearer or Lucifer.

Lucina

The goddess of childbirth, hunting, and marriage. An aspect of Diana or Juno. Occasionally referred to as Lucina, Diana, Diana, Albunea, Dian, Diane, Albunea, Dian(e), Dione, Jana, Czech Devana, Greek Artemis, Polish Dziewona, Serbian Dilwica, Hecate, Ilithyia, Ilithyia, Eileithyia, Eilithieia, Eilithua, Eilithyia, Eleuthia, Ilythia, Juno, Eil(e)ithyia, Eil(e)itheia, Eleuthyra, Cretan Eleuthea, Egyptian Nekhbet, Roman Juno, Ilithyiae, Juno, Juno, Capritona, Covella, Jugalis, Cinxia, Domiduca, Great Goddess, Huga, Iuno, Iterduca, Jugalia, Opigina, Pronuba, Queen of Heaven, Sispes, Sororia, Etruscan Uni, Greek Hera, Greek Ilithyia, Greek Ilithyia, Juno Lucina or Juno Lucina.

Lucius Hiberius

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Lucretia

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Lucretius

Father of Lucretia. At times, called Lucretius.

Lucumo

An Etruscan. Son of Demaratus. He became the fifth king of Rome as Tarquinius Priscus. In some lore, occasionally known as Lucumo, Tarquinius Priscus, Tarquinius Priscus, Lucius Tarquinius or Tarquin.

Ludi Apollinares

Games in honour of Apollo. Also identified as Ludi Apollinares.

Ludi Capitolini

Games in honour of Jupiter, held in October. At times, referred to as Ludi Capitolini, Ludi Magni, Ludi Magni, Ludi Maximi, Ludi Plebei, Ludi Romani or Ludi Capitalini.

Ludi Cerialis

Games in honour of Ceres. Sometimes known as Ludi Cerialis, Cerealia, Cerealia or Ceralia.

Ludi Florialis

Games in honour of Flora. Sometimes identified as Ludi Florialis.

Ludi Magni

Games in honour of Jupiter. Sometimes called Ludi Magni, Ludi Capitolini, Ludi Capitolini, Ludi Plebei, Ludi Romani, Ludi Maximi, Ludi Maximi, Ludi Capitalini or Ludi Capitalini.

Ludi Megalenses

Games in honour of Cybele. In some lore, occasionally known as Ludi Megalenses.

Ludi Plebei

Games in honour of Jupiter, held in November. Sometimes identified as Ludi Plebei, Ludi Capitolini, Ludi Capitolini, Ludi Magni, Ludi Romani, Ludi Capitalini or Ludi Capitalini.

Ludi Romani

Games in honour of Jupiter, held in September. In some references, identified as Ludi Romani, Ludi Capitolini, Ludi Capitolini, Ludi Magni, Ludi Plebei, Ludi Capitalini or Ludi Capitalini.

Luna

A moon-goddess. In some lore, occasionally referred to as Luna, Greek Phoebe, Greek Phoebe, Selene, Selene, Artemis, Chromia, Hera, Io, Mene, Pasiphae, Phoebe, Selena, Asterodia, Phoebe, Seline or Roman Luna.

Lupercalia

A festival honouring Faunus, Lupercus or the wolf that suckled Romulus and Remus, held on February 15th. Also commonly identified as Lupercalia.

Lupercii

The young men or priests who took. Part in the rites of the Lupercalia. Also commonly referred to as Lupercii.

Lupercus

An ancient Italian god of fertility, flocks and wolves. In some accounts, he is equated with Faunus. Occasionally known as Lupercus, Faunus, Faunus, Fatu(cl)us, Faun, Incubo, In(n)uus, Silvan, plurFauni, Greek Pan, Faunus, Pan, Pan, Feeder, Herdsman, 'all', Capricorn, Goat-god, Goat-Pan, Nomius, Pasturer, Shepherd God, plurpanes, Roman Consentes or Evander.

lustrum

A sacrificial rite of purification held. Every 5 years. Sometimes referred to as lustrum.

Lybica

A sibyl. In some accounts, referred to as Lybica.

Lympha

A nature-goddess. Sometimes identified as Lympha.

Magna Mater

A mother-goddess. This deity is represented in Rome by a black meteoric stone. In some accounts, known as Magna Mater, Cybele, Cybele, Agdistis, Cybebe, Cybelle, Idaea, Kubele, Kybebe, Kybele, Lion-and-bee Goddess, Maia, Great Mother, Meter Dindymene, White Goddess, Gaulish Berecynthia, Greek Demeter, Idaea, Idaean Mother, Rhea, Roman Bona Dea, Ceres, Maia, Mater Turrita, Ops, Sumerian Inanna, Syrian Kubaba, Phrygian Cybele, Phrygian Cybele, Anat, Aphrodite, Astarte, Bona Dea, Demeter, Inanna, Kubaba, Rhea, Greek Rhea, Greek Rhea or Ops.

majores

Senior flamines chosen from the patricians. At times, called majores.

Maligernii

Evil spirits. On occassion, referred to as Maligernii.

Mamercus

Son of Numa Pompilius. Brother of Pinis and Pompo. Also referred to as Mamercus.

Mamurius Veturius

The celestial smith who made copies of the ancile. In some accounts, known as Mamurius Veturius, ancile, ancile, ancilia or plurancilia.

Mandrabue

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Manes

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Mania

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Manlius

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Mantus

One of the Etruscan guardians of hell. Consort of Mania. Also commonly identified as Mantus, Mantrns or Mantrns.

Marcii

Early oracular prophets. In some accounts, there was only one such prophet, Marcius. Also known as Marcii, Marcius or Marcius.

Maris

An Etruscan war-god. At times, referred to as Maris, Greek Ares, Greek Ares, Anhur, Gradivus, Gravidus, Karttikeya, Mars, Nergal, Skanda, Roman Mars, Roman Mars, Belatucadros, Camulos, Camulos, Cariociecus, Nergal or Tyr.

Mars

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Mars Gradivus

Mars as the patron of the Campus Martius. At times, known as Mars Gradivus.

Mars Loucetius

A name for Mars as 'brilliant'. Also identified as Mars Loucetius, Loucetius, Loucetius or Mars.

Mars Quirinus

A name for Mars as protector of the state. Sometimes called Mars Quirinus.

Mars Rigonometis

A name for Mars as king of the sacred grove. Identified as Mars Rigonometis, Rigonometis, Rigonometis or Mars.

Mars Ultor

A name for Mars as 'avenger of Caesar'. Called Mars Ultor, Ultor, Ultor or Mars.

Marspiter

A name for Mars as Father Mars. Identified as Marspiter, Maspiter or Maspiter.

Mastarna

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Mastralia

A festival in honour of Mater Matuta, April 11th. Occasionally called Mastralia.

Mater Matuta

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Mater Turrita

An earth-goddess, goddess of fertility. Her attendants were the noisy Corybantes. At times, called Mater Turrita, Cybele, Cybele, Agdistis, Cybebe, Cybelle, Idaea, Kubele, Kybebe, Kybele, Lion-and-bee Goddess, Maia, Great Mother, Meter Dindymene, White Goddess, Gaulish Berecynthia, Greek Demeter, Idaea, Idaean Mother, Rhea, Roman Bona Dea, Ceres, Magna Mater, Maia, Ops, Sumerian Inanna, Syrian Kubaba, Rhea, Rhea, Adrastea, Rheia, Rheie, Phrygian Cybele, Roman Magna Mater, Greek Rhea, Greek Rhea or Ops.

Matralia

A festival in honour of Mater Matuta. Held on June 11th. Also called Matralia.

Matres

Celtic mother-goddesses, goddesses of the household. In some accounts, identified as Matres, Deae Matres, Deae Matres, Matrae, Matrae, Matronae, Matronae, Mothers, Mothers, The Mothers, The Mothers, Welsh Mamau or Welsh Mamau.

Matronalia

A festival in honour of Juno Lucina. Held on March 1st. Sometimes identified as Matronalia.

Mean

An Etruscan deity. In some accounts, referred to as Mean.

Medea

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Meditrina

A goddess of healing. Occasionally referred to as Meditrina.

Meditrinalia

A festival in honour of Jupiter and Meditrina. In some references, known as Meditrinalia.

Mefitis

An Italian goddess of sulphurous. Vapours. In some accounts, known as Mefitis.

Mellonia

A bee-goddess. On occassion, called Mellonia.

Mens

A goddess, right thinking personified. Also identified as Mens, Mens Bona or Mens Bona.

Mercuralia

A festival in honour of Mercury held in May. Sometimes known as Mercuralia.

Mercury

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Messor

A god of agriculture. Also commonly called Messor.

Metabus

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Metamorphoses

Tales from Greek mythology by Ovid. Occasionally called Metamorphoses, Golden Ass, The or Golden Ass, The.

Meticus

A charioteer to Aeneas in Italy. In some references, known as Meticus.

Mettius Fuffetius

A king of Alba Longa. When he deserted the side of Tullius Hostilius, his superior king, Tullius had him torn apart between two chariots. Also called Mettius Fuffetius.

Minerva

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Minervalia

Festivals in honour of Minerva. In some lore, occasionally identified as Minervalia.

minores

Junior flamines chosen from plebeians. On occassion, referred to as minores.

Mithraeum

A temple dedicated to Mithra in which bulls were sacrificed. Also commonly known as Mithraeum.

Mithras

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Mlacuch

An Etruscan deity. In some accounts, known as Mlacuch.

Moccus

A Celtic swine-god in Gaul. Occasionally known as Moccus, Moccos or Moccos.

Mogounos

A Celtic sun-god in France. On occassion, identified as Mogounos, Mogons or Mogons.

Moneta

A goddess of prosperity, an aspect of Juno. She appeared in the form of a hen. In some accounts, known as Moneta, African Aje or African Aje.

mormos

Blood-sucking monsters. Occasionally known as mormos.

Mors

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Morta

One of the 3 Fates, the Parcae. Also called Morta, Etruscan Culsu, Etruscan Culsu, Greek Atropos, Greek Atropos or Culsu.

Mulciber

A name for Vulcan as 'melter'. Called Mulciber, Vulcan, Vulcan, Hephaestus, Kalvaistis, Volcanus, Volkanus, Vulcanus, Quietus, Velchanos, Etruscan Sethlans or Greek Hephaestus.

mundus

A pit in Rome which was said to lead to the underworld: a pit into which the first fruits are placed as offerings. Also called mundus.

Mutinus

A fertility-god. Women made offerings to this deity in the hope of bearing children. In some references, called Mutinus, Mutunus, Mutunus, Mutunus Tutunus, Mutunus Tutunus, Mutunus (Tutunus), Mutunus (Tutunus), Egyptian Min, Egyptian Min, Priapus, Greek Priapus, Greek Priapus or Min.

Navius

A prophet. When challenged by Tarquinius Priscus, he cut a whetstone in half with a razor. In some references, called Navius.

Necessitas

A goddess of destiny. In some accounts, identified as Necessitas, Greek Ananke or Greek Ananke.

Nemausicae

3 Celtic mother-goddesses of Nimes. In some references, referred to as Nemausicae.

Nemetona

A Celtic deity in Britain, a goddess of groves in Gaul, a war-god(dess). Also identified as Nemetona, nemeton, nemeton, neimed, nemed or nemetona.

Nemi wood

A sacred grove. In the fertility rite symbolising death and resurrection, the old kingpriest was killed in this grove by his young successor. In some lore, occasionally identified as Nemi wood.

Nemoralia

A festival in honour of Diana, celebrated on August 13th. In some references, referred to as Nemoralia, Grove Festival or Grove Festival.

Neptunalia

A festival in honour of Neptune, June 23rd. Sometimes known as Neptunalia.

Neptune

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Nerio

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Niskae

Celtic spirits of rivers and wells in Gaul: mother-goddesses. In some accounts, identified as Niskae, Niskai or Niskai.

Nodotus

A Celtic god of cereals. Sometimes known as Nodotus.

Nona

One of the 3 Fates. She was originally regarded as a goddess of birth. In some references, referred to as Nona.

Nonae Capritonae

A festival in honour of Juno, held on July 7th. Also known as Nonae Capritonae, Nones of the Wild Fig or Nones of the Wild Fig.

Novensides

A group of 9 Etruscan deities. On occassion, called Novensides, Nouensides, Nouensides, Nouensiles, Nouensiles, Novensiles or Novensiles.

Nox

A goddess of night. In some references, identified as Nox, Greek Nyx or Greek Nyx.

Numa Pompilius

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Numina

The early Roman abstract deities. Occasionally referred to as Numina.

Numitor

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Obarator

A god of agriculture. Also commonly called Obarator.

Occator

A god of agriculture. Occasionally referred to as Occator.

Ocelus

A Celtic god of healing. In some accounts, called Ocelus.

Ocresia

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October Horse Festival

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Opalia

A festival held in honour of Ops on December 19th. In some lore, occasionally known as Opalia.

Ophiucus

A god of healing. Sometimes referred to as Ophiucus, Greek Asclepius, Greek Asclepius, Eshmun or Imhotep.

Opiconsivia

A festival in honour of Ops, August 25th. Occasionally called Opiconsivia.

Opigina

A goddess of childbirth. Her function was to help the mother bring forth her child. She was later assimilated into Juno. Called Opigina, Juno, Juno, Capritona, Covella, Jugalis, Cinxia, Domiduca, Great Goddess, Huga, Iuno, Iterduca, Jugalia, Lucina, Pronuba, Queen of Heaven, Sispes, Sororia, Etruscan Uni, Greek Hera or Ilithyia.

Ops

The goddess of the harvest, plenty and wealth. Wife of Consus. Second wife of Saturn. Mother of Jupiter and Neptune. Occasionally known as Ops, Cybele, Cybele, Agdistis, Cybebe, Cybelle, Idaea, Kubele, Kybebe, Kybele, Lion-and-bee Goddess, Maia, Great Mother, Meter Dindymene, White Goddess, Gaulish Berecynthia, Greek Demeter, Idaea, Idaean Mother, Rhea, Roman Bona Dea, Ceres, Magna Mater, Maia, Mater Turrita, Sumerian Inanna, Syrian Kubaba, Eire, Eire, Ama, Anith, Anu, Aonach, Eadna, Eirean, Eirin, Eoghana, Eri, Erin, Eriu, Iath, Ith, Momo, Mumham, Nannam, Nanu, Ops, Sibhol, Ama, Anan, Anu, EireanEoghana, Eri(u), I(a)th, Momo, Nannan, Sibhd, Tlachtga, Eri, Rhea, Rhea, Adrastea, Rheia, Rheie, Phrygian Cybele, Roman Magna Mater, sacred birds, sacred birds, birds, Ainu Ahura Mazda, Amaterasu, Apollo, Athena, Helius, Hermes, Mercury, Mithra, Nyx, Tammuz, Zas Arawn, Artemis, China, Fukurokuju, Kwannon, Lares, Mannanan, Perseus, Shou Shen, Thoth Apollo, Asclepius, Angerbode Brac, Cronus, Odin, Saturn, Yama Juno Aphrodite, Astarte Ararjatis, Ataragatis, Hachiman, Venus Dusara, Jupiter Egypt Apollo, Baba, Brahma, Dionysus, Egypt, Eros, Epona, Hera, Horus, Iris, Juno, Kaltesh, Mars, Osiris, Seb, Thoth, Vishnu Isis Apollo, Here, Tethys Zoastrianism Asclepius, Inara Ketu, Minerva Brahma, Lakshmi, Sarasvati Apollo, Melkarth Asclepius, Noah, Odin Saturn Aphrodite, Venus Hera, Sweden Aphrodite, Isis Aphrodite, Venus Aztecs, Maya Apollo, Ares Heracles, Isis, Izanagi or Izanami Ares Triptolemus Amaterasu.

Orcus

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Ovid

A 1st C BC. Poet. He was the author of Amores, Fasti, Heroides, Medea, Metamorphoses, etc. Also called Ovid, Naso, Naso, Publius Ovidius Naso, Publius Ovidius Naso, (Publius Ovidius) Naso or (Publius Ovidius) Naso.

Palatia

A female deity of the north pole. Sometimes called Palatia, Palanta, Palanta, Palanto, Palanto, Palato, Palato, Pala(n)to or Pala(n)to.

Palatium

A sacred hill. One of the seven hills of Rome, the Palatine. In some references, called Palatium.

Pales

A god or goddess of cattle, flocks, and shepherds. At times, referred to as Pales.

Palilia

A festival in honour of Pales held on April 21st. In some references, called Palilia, Parilia or Parilia.

Parcae

The Fates, Decuma, Morta and Nona. Daughters of Ananke, some say. In some accounts, Parcae was originally a goddess of childbirth. Sometimes identified as Parcae, Fates, Fates, Norns, Moirae, Greek Moirae, Greek Moirae, Fati, Norse Norns or Norse Norns.

Parentalia

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Partula

A goddess of child-birth. Also identified as Partula.

Pavor

A deity, panic personified. In some references, known as Pavor.

Pax

The goddess of peace. She is depicted as a maiden with a cornucopia. Sometimes called Pax, Greek Eirene or Greek Eirene.

Peace

One of the 5 Appiades. At times, referred to as Peace.

peacock

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Penates

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Petronius

A 1st C. Writer, author of Troiae Halosis. In some accounts, known as Petronius.

Phillipan

The sword of Antony, a triumvir. In some references, called Phillipan.

Picumnus

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Picus

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Pietas

A goddess, respect personified. On occassion, called Pietas.

Pilumnus

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Pinus

Son of Numa Pompilius. Brother of Mamercus and Pompo. At times, identified as Pinus.

Plautus

A dramatist. He wrote some twenty comedies, including Captivi and Amphitryon. In some accounts, called Plautus, (c, (c, Charlemagne, Mahavira, Patrick, Thomas the Rhymer, 254-184 or 254-184.

Pluto

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Plutus

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Poeninus

A Celtic mountain-god of the Alpine area. Also commonly identified as Poeninus.

Pollux

The Roman name for Polydeuces. At times, known as Pollux.

Pomona

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Pomonal

A place sacred to Pomona. Sometimes known as Pomonal.

Pomonus

An early Italian creator-god. Also referred to as Pomonus, Pupdike or Pupdike.

Pompo

Son of Numa Pompilius. Brother of Manercus and Pinus. Occasionally referred to as Pompo.

pontifex

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Poplifugia

A festival in honour of Jupiter, held on July 5th. Occasionally identified as Poplifugia.

Portumnus

A sea-god, god of harbours, husbands. He was originally the god of entrances. In some accounts, known as Portumnus, Portunus, Portunus, Greek Melicertes, Greek Melicertes, Palaemon, Palaemon, Heracles or Palaimon.

Portunalia

A festival in honour of Portumnus, August 17th. In some accounts, known as Portunalia.

Postumius

A leader of the Romans. He defeated the Latins at the Battle of Lake Regillus with the help of Castor and Pollux. Also referred to as Postumius.

Potina

A guardian goddess of infants. Identified as Potina, Potua or Potua.

Praedator

A name of Jupiter as 'snatcher of booty'. Occasionally identified as Praedator, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunderbearer, Thunder-darter, Thunder-master, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon or Greek Zeus.

Primagenia

The goddess Fortuna at Praeneste. Daughter of Jupitar. Occasionally called Primagenia, Fortuna, Fortuna, Felicitas, Greek Tyche or Italian Fors (Fortuna).

Proca

A king of Alba Longa. Son of Janus and Cardea or Carna. Father of Amulius and Numitor. Also referred to as Proca.

Proculus, Julius

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Promitor

A god of agriculture. In some accounts, identified as Promitor.

Pronuba

A name of Juno as the patroness of marriage. Known as Pronuba, Juno, Juno, Capritona, Covella, Jugalis, Cinxia, Domiduca, Great Goddess, Huga, Iuno, Iterduca, Jugalia, Lucina, Opigina, Queen of Heaven, Sispes, Sororia, Etruscan Uni, Greek Hera or Ilithyia.

Propertius

A 1st C BC. Poet and mythographer. Also called Propertius.

Proserpina

Goddess of the underworld. Daughter of Jupiter and Ceres. Wife of Pluto. Occasionally identified as Proserpina, Core, Core, Anahita, Cora, Corinna, Corinne, Kora, Kore, Kore-Arethusa, Koure, Maiden, The, Persephone, Pherepatta, Ko(u)re, Persephassa, Phersephatta, Polyboea, The Maiden, The Mistress, 'virgin', Persian Anahita, Roman Libera, Proserpine, Despoena, Proserpine, Proserpine, Greek Core, Greek Core or Libera.

Providentia

A goddess of prudence. Identified as Providentia.

Proximae

A group of Celtic guardian goddesses. Sometimes referred to as Proximae.

Psaphon

A man who trained many birds to speak his name. In some lore, occasionally identified as Psaphon.

Psyche

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psychopomp

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Pudicita

A goddess of chastity. Also called Pudicita.

Pultuce

An Etruscan version of Pollux. Castor and Pultuce were later merged with the Tindaridae. In some references, identified as Pultuce.

Purtupita

An early Italian vegetation deity. Also known as Purtupita, Purtupitus or Purtupitus.

Puta

A goddess of agriculture. Occasionally called Puta.

Quadriviae

Mother-goddesses and goddesses of the cross-roads. In some lore, occasionally known as Quadriviae.

Quietus

A title of Vulcan. Also commonly called Quietus, Vulcan, Vulcan, Hephaestus, Kalvaistis, Volcanus, Volkanus, Vulcanus, Mulciber, Velchanos, Etruscan Sethlans or Greek Hephaestus.

Quinquatria

Festivals in honour of Minerva, 19th- 23rd March. Sometimes identified as Quinquatria.

Quirinalia

A festival in honour of Quirinus, held on February 17th. In some accounts, known as Quirinalia.

Quirinus

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Quiritis

A Sabine guardian-goddess of mothers. Known as Quiritis.

Racilia

Wife of Cincinnatus. Mother of Lucius. Sometimes referred to as Racilia.

Rape of the Sabine Women

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Recaranus

A creator-deity. Also known as Recaranus, Garanus or Garanus.

Redarator

A god of agriculture. Sometimes identified as Redarator.

Regina

A name of Juno as 'queen'. Sometimes called Regina.

Regulus

A hero who gave his life for his country. For his bravery, the gods placed him in the heavens as a star in Leo. At times, known as Regulus.

Rehtia

An early Italian goddess of good. Fortune. Occasionally known as Rehtia.

Remus

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Rhamnes

A king. Rhamnes was also an augur and was one of those fighting on the side of Turnus against Aeneas. He was killed by Nisus. At times, known as Rhamnes.

Rhea

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Rhea Silvia

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Rhoetus

One of the Rutulians killed by Euralyus. Also called Rhoetus, Rhoetos or Rhoetos.

Rhome

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Rigisamus

A Celtic war-god in Gaul. Occasionally called Rigisamus.

Ritona

A Celtic goddess of fords. Also referred to as Ritona.

Robigalia

A festival in honour of Robigus, held on April 25th. On occassion, referred to as Robigalia.

Robigus

A guardian-god of cornfields. On occassion, referred to as Robigus, Robigo, Robigo, Averruncus or Averruncus.

Roma

A tutelary goddess. Occasionally referred to as Roma, Rome, Rome, Roma or Roma.

Roman Antiquities

A twenty-volume history and mythology of Rome, written by Dionysius of Helicarnassus. In some accounts, called Roman Antiquities.

Rome

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Romulus

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Rosmerta

A Celtic fertility goddess in Gaul. Guardian of merchants. Consort of Mercury. On occassion, identified as Rosmerta, Maia, Maia, Cybele or Maya.

Rudianos

A Gaulish war-god. In some lore, occasionally referred to as Rudianos.

Rudiobus

A Celtic horse-god in Gaul. In some references, referred to as Rudiobus.

Rumina

A goddess of nursing mothers. On occassion, called Rumina, Rumia or Rumia.

Ruminalis

The fig-tree under which the infants Romulus and Remus were found. In some lore, occasionally referred to as Ruminalis, Ruminal or Ruminal.

Rusor

An ancient god. At times, known as Rusor, 'ploughman' or 'ploughman'.

Salacia

Goddess of springs. Goddess of the salt seas, some say. Wife of Neptune. On occassion, referred to as Salacia, Canens, Canens, Canentes, Venilia, Venilia, Greek Amphitrite or Greek Amphitrite.

Salii

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Salus

A goddess of health and public welfare. Her festival was celebrated on April 30th. Also commonly called Salus, Greek Hygeia, Greek Hygeia, Strenia, Valetudo, Sabine Strenia or Sabine Strenia.

Santa

A Sabine fertility-goddess. In some references, called Santa.

Saritor

A god of weeds. In some accounts, called Saritor.

Sarritor

A god of agriculture. In some accounts, referred to as Sarritor.

Saturn

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Saturnalia

A festival in honour of Saturn, December 17th-19th. At this festival, masters and servants exchange roles for the day. At times, known as Saturnalia, Sigillaria or Sigillaria.

Scaevola

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Secular Games

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Securita

A guardian goddess protecting. The empire. Also called Securita, Securitas or Securitas.

Seia

A guardian-goddess of newly-planted. Corn. Occasionally known as Seia.

Seian Horse

A horse apparently bringing ill-fortune to its owner. Occasionally called Seian Horse.

Selvans

An Italian god, possibly a god of agriculture and forests. In some lore, occasionally called Selvans.

Semnocosus

A Spanish war-god. Also commonly identified as Semnocosus.

Semo

A vegetation-god, sower of seed. He was later absorbed into Sancus as Semo-Sancus. Occasionally referred to as Semo, Sancus, Sancus, Semo Sancus, Greek Zeus Pistios or Roman Fidius.

Servius Tullius

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Sethlans

An Italian smith-god. Also referred to as Sethlans, Sethlaus, Sethlaus, Greek Hephaestus, Greek Hephaestus, Kalvaistis, Ptah, Regin, Tvashtri, Vulcan, Roman Vulcan or Roman Vulcan.

sibyl

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Sibyl of Cumae

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Sibylline Books

9 books of prophecies written. By the Sibyl of Cumae. Sometimes referred to as Sibylline Books, Sibyl of Cumae, Sibyl of Cumae, Amalthea, Amphyrisian Prophetess, Cumaean Sibyl, Deiphobe, Demophile, Erythraean Sibyl, Herophile, Amalthea, Amphrysian Prophetess or Herophile.

Sigillaria

The latter part of the Saturnalia. Also referred to as Sigillaria, Saturnalia or Saturnalia.

Silvan

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Silvani

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Silvius

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Sispes

A local name for Juno. In this form, she is depicted as wearing a goatskin and armed. At times, identified as Sispes, Juno, Juno, Capritona, Covella, Jugalis, Cinxia, Domiduca, Great Goddess, Huga, Iuno, Iterduca, Jugalia, Lucina, Opigina, Pronuba, Queen of Heaven, Sororia, Etruscan Uni, Greek Hera, Ilithyia, Sospita or Sospita.

Snenanth

An Italian deity. Sometimes identified as Snenanth.

Sol

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Solanus

A wind from the north-east quarter. Also commonly referred to as Solanus, Greek Ap(h)eliotes or Greek Ap(h)eliotes.

Somnus

The god of sleep. Son of Nyx. Twin brother of Mors. Sometimes referred to as Somnus, Greek Hupnus, Greek Hupnus, Hypnus, Hypnus, Hupnos, Hypnos or Roman Somnus.

Soranus

An Italian god. On occassion, referred to as Soranus.

Sors

A god of fortune. Also called Sors.

Spes

A goddess, hope personified. On occassion, called Spes.

Spiniensis

A god of agriculture. On occassion, called Spiniensis.

Spurius Lartius

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Spurius Tarpeius

Father of Tarpeia. In some lore, occasionally called Spurius Tarpeius.

Stata Mater

A fire-goddess. She was said to be able to make fires stand still. On occassion, identified as Stata Mater.

Statius

A 1st C BC. Poet. He was the author of Achilleis, Thebais, etc. At times, identified as Statius.

Sterculius

A name for Picumnus as a god of manuring. In some references, referred to as Sterculius, Picumnus, Picumnus, Picus, Stercutus, Stercutus, Sterquilinius or Sterquilinius.

Stimula

A minor goddess. A goddess who excites passion in women. In some accounts, she is identified with Semele. Also identified as Stimula, Semele, Semele, Fauna, Thyone, Keraunia, Phrygian Zemelo, Roman Fauna or Zagreus.

strenae

Twigs used in the New Year festival. These twigs were taken from a grove sacred to Strenia and were given as tokens of good fortune. Sometimes known as strenae.

Strenia

A Sabine goddess of the New Year festivities. Known as Strenia, Greek Hygeia, Greek Hygeia, Salus, Valetudo, Roman Salus, Roman Salus or Hygeia.

striges

Blood-sucking monsters. On occassion, known as striges.

Suadela

The goddess of persuasion, particularly in romance, seduction and love. Occasionally referred to as Suadela, Greek Peitho or Greek Peitho.

Sucellus

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Suculae

The Roman name for the Nysaean. Nymphs (Hyades). At times, identified as Suculae, Greek Hyades or Greek Hyades.

Sulevia

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Summamus

An Italian storm-god. In the Roman pantheon, he was regarded as the god of the night sky. His festival was celebrated on 20th June. Also referred to as Summamus, 'highest' or 'highest'.

suovetaurilia

A sacrifice of pig, sheep and ox. In some lore, occasionally identified as suovetaurilia.

Superi

The gods and other inhabitants of the heavens. Also commonly referred to as Superi, Inferi or Inferi.

Svutaf

An Italian god in the form of a youth with wings. Also commonly referred to as Svutaf.

swallow

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Tages

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tages

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Tanaquil

The Roman name for Caecilia. Sometimes referred to as Tanaquil.

Tarchetius

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Tarchies

An Etruscan sage. He taught Tarchon the arts of haruspicy. Some accounts equate him with Tages. Sometimes called Tarchies.

Tarchon

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Tarpeia

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Tarquinia

Sister of Tarquinius Superbus. Mother of Brutus. Sometimes referred to as Tarquinia.

Tarquinius Arruns

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Tarquinius Collatinus

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Tarquinius Priscus

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Tarquinius, Sextus

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Tarquinius Superbus

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Tarutius

Husband of Acca Larentia. In the story that identifies Acca Larentia with the prostitute Fabula, he married her after she gave up prostitution, a wealthy woman. Also referred to as Tarutius.

Tarvos

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Tatia

First wife of Numa Pompilius. Referred to as Tatia.

Tatius

A Sabine king. He is said to have captured the Capitol following the rape of the Sabine women and ruled jointly with Romulus. Also referred to as Tatius.

taurobolium

The sacrificial slaughter of bulls to Mithras or Cybele when devotees. Bathed in the blood of the slaughtered animals. Known as taurobolium, criobolium, criobolium or kriobolion.

Tellumo

An ancient earth-god. Consort of Tellus. In some accounts, referred to as Tellumo, Tellurus, Tellurus or Tellus.

Tellurus

An ancient earth-god. Consort of Tellus. Also called Tellurus, Tellumo, Tellumo or Tellus.

Tellus

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Teratius

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Terminal

A bust of the god Terminus erected at street corners, etc. In some accounts, known as Terminal, Greek Herma or Greek Herma.

Terminalia

A festival in honour of Terminus, 23rd February. Occasionally known as Terminalia.

Terminus

A god of boundaries. Occasionally known as Terminus, Hermes, Hermes, Anubis, Arcus, Camillus, Hermeias, Master of Animals, sacred birds, Terminus, Agoneus, Arais, Arg(e)iphontes, Atlantiades, Clithonius, Cyllen(ius), Hermanubis, Master Thief, Nomius, Oneicopompus, Pasturer, Psychogogue, Psychopomp(us), The Master, Trismegistus, Egyptian Anubis, Thoth, Etruscan Turms, Roman Mercury, Charidotes, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Thunderbearer, Thunder-darter, Thunder-master, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon, Greek Zeus, Mercury, Mercury, Mercurius, Merqurius, Mircurios, Mirqurios, Terminus, Mergurius, Mirqurius, Psychopompus or Greek Hermes.

Thalna

An Etruscan goddess of childbirth. Occasionally called Thalna.

Thebais

A poem by Statius dealing with the story of Oedipus. At times, identified as Thebais.

Thesan

An Etruscan goddess of the dawn and childbirth. Occasionally identified as Thesan.

Thunder-darter

A name of Jupiter. In some lore, occasionally identified as Thunder-darter, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunderbearer, Thunder-master, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon or Greek Zeus.

Thunder-master

A name of Jupiter. Called Thunder-master, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunderbearer, Thunder-darter, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon or Greek Zeus.

Thunder-smiter

A name of Jupiter. Also called Thunder-smiter, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunderbearer, Thunder-darter, Thunder-master, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon or Greek Zeus.

Thunderbearer

A name of Jupiter. Sometimes called Thunderbearer, Jupiter, Jupiter, Diespiter, Diu-pater, Elicius, Fulgurator, Iupiter, Iuppiter, Jove, Juppiter, Papaeus, sacred plants, Sky Father, Terminus, Zeus, (Deus) Fides, Diovis(-pater), Fidius, Fulgans, Fulgar, Imperator, Invictus, Iup(p)iter, Jove, Pluvius, Praedator, Sky Father, Terminus, Thunder-darter, Thunder-master, Thunder-smiter, Etruscan Tinia, Egyptian Amon or Greek Zeus.

thunderbolt

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Tiberinus

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Tiberius

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Tinia

An Etruscan supreme god, god of storms and thunder. Consort of Uni. Sometimes called Tinia, Tin, Tin, Tina, Tina, Tin(a), Tin(a), Greek Zeus, Greek Zeus, Amen, Baal-Samin, Cragus, Indra, Jupiter, Marduk, Roman Jupiter, Roman Jupiter, Ambres, Amen, Bussumarus, Dyaus or Jessis.

Tinnus

A thunder-god in Gaul. Sometimes known as Tinnus, Tannus or Tannus.

Titus

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Titus Herminius

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Titus Tatius

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Tiv

An Etruscan moon-deity. At times, called Tiv.

Tonans

A name of Jupiter as 'thunderer'. Also called Tonans.

Tortor

A name for Apollo as tower. Occasionally called Tortor, Apollo, Apollo, Apollon, Abaeus, Abaios, Aguieus, Agyieus, Aleuromantes, Apellon, Apotropaeus, Archer God, Atepomarus, Carneios, Catharsius, Cynthius, Delian, Delius, Delphinius, Eulalon, Hecatos, Helius, Karn(ei)os, Loxias, Lyc(a)eus, Lykaios, Lyc(el)ius, Lycian, Musagetes, Nomius, Paean, Pae(e)on, Paion, Pasturer, Phoebus Apollo, Pytheus, Pythian, Pyth(i)us, Rat-killer, Sminthian, Smintheus, Sminthius, Sol, Tyrxis, British Maponus, Etruscan Aplu, Veiovis, Gaulish Atepomarus or Roman Apellun.

Trajan

An emperor who was deified with the name Trojanus. In some lore, occasionally called Trajan.

Treverae

Celtic mother-goddesses of Trier. Called Treverae.

Tria Fata

Goddesses of fate, assimilated to the Parcae or the Moirae. In some lore, occasionally known as Tria Fata, Fata or Fata.

Triumphator

A named of Jupiter as 'the. Triumphant'. Also known as Triumphator.

triumphus

A celebration at the return of a victorious general when sacrifices. Were offered to Jupiter. In some lore, occasionally identified as triumphus.

Trivia

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Troiae Halosis

A poem by Petronius on the fall of Troy. Sometimes called Troiae Halosis.

Trojanus

A god, the Roman Emperor Trajan. Deified. In some accounts, called Trojanus.

Tubilstrium

A festival held in March in honour of Mars. Sometimes identified as Tubilstrium.

Tuchulcha

An Etruscan deity of the underworld. An assistant to Mantus. On occassion, called Tuchulcha.

Tullia

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Tullius Hostilius

The third king of Rome. For destroying Alba and its inhabitants, he and all his family were killed by Poseidon. Also referred to as Tullius Hostilius, Hostilius, Hostilius, Tullus Hostilius or Tullus Hostilius.

Turan

A winged Etruscan fertility-goddess and goddess of love. On occassion, known as Turan, Greek Aphrodite, Greek Aphrodite, Alilat, Anahit, Anahita, Anaitis, Aphrodisias, Aprodita, Argimpasa, Astarte, Biducht, Caelestis, Concordia, Hathor, Ishtar, Mylitta, Rati, Syrian Goddess, Roman Venus, Roman Venus, Aphrodite or Rati.

Turms

An Etruscan god of the underworld. Mahaf) Occasionally referred to as Turms.

Turnus

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Tursa

An early goddess of terror. Also referred to as Tursa.

Twelve Books of Tages

A record of the wisdom passed to the Etruscans by the god Tages. Occasionally called Twelve Books of Tages, Books of Tages, Books of Tages, Acherontian Books, Acherontian Books or Twelve Books.

Ubertas

A god of agriculture. At times, referred to as Ubertas.

Ulysses

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umbra

In the theory of a threefold soul, the umbra hovered over the body. At death. Occasionally known as umbra.

Unconquerable, The

A Roman name for Heracles. Occasionally known as Unconquerable, The.

Uni

An Etruscan guardian goddess. Consort of Tin. Called Uni.

Unxia

A goddess of marriage. Also referred to as Unxia.

Vacuna

A Sabine goddess of horticulture. In some lore, occasionally referred to as Vacuna.

Vagitanus

A guardian god of babies who caused. Them to utter their first cry. Called Vagitanus, Fabulinus, Fabulinus or Vagtanus.

Valetudo

A goddess of health. In some accounts she is the same as Salus. Occasionally identified as Valetudo, Hygeia, Hygeia, Athena, Athena Hygeia, Hugeia, Hygia, Hygieia, Hygi(ei)a, Roman Salus, Salus, Salus, Greek Hygeia or Sabine Strenia.

Vanth

An Etruscan goddess of the underworld. This being has wings each of which has a large eye on the inside. In some accounts, identified as Vanth.

vates

A prophet. Occasionally known as vates.

Veiovis

A youthful Etruscan god of shepherds whose festival, the Agonium, was held on May 21st. Sometimes identified as Veiovis, Apollo, Apollo, Apollon, Abaeus, Abaios, Aguieus, Agyieus, Aleuromantes, Apellon, Apotropaeus, Archer God, Atepomarus, Carneios, Catharsius, Cynthius, Delian, Delius, Delphinius, Eulalon, Hecatos, Helius, Karn(ei)os, Loxias, Lyc(a)eus, Lykaios, Lyc(el)ius, Lycian, Musagetes, Nomius, Paean, Pae(e)on, Paion, Pasturer, Phoebus Apollo, Pytheus, Pythian, Pyth(i)us, Rat-killer, Sminthian, Smintheus, Sminthius, Sol, Tortor, Tyrxis, British Maponus, Etruscan Aplu, Gaulish Atepomarus, Roman Apellun, Vediovis, Vediovis, Vedius, Vedius, Veive, Veive, Vejovis, Vejovis, Vetis, Vetis, Greek Apollo, Greek Apollo, Angus Og, Apellun, Aplu, Maponus or Surya.

Veltune

An Etruscan god. At times, referred to as Veltune.

Veneralia

A festival in honour of Venus, held on 1st April. Also commonly referred to as Veneralia.

Venilia

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Venus

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Venus Anadyomene

Venus rising from the foam. Also called Venus Anadyomene.

Venus Erycina

A Sicilian love-goddess. Some say she was the wife of Anchises. Sometimes known as Venus Erycina, Erucina, Erucina, Erycina, Erycina, Venus Erucina, Venus Erucina, (Venus) Erucina or (Venus) Erucina.

Venus Genetrix

Venus as the goddess of motherhood. At times, referred to as Venus Genetrix.

Venus Verticordia

Venus as the goddess of virtue. In some accounts, referred to as Venus Verticordia.

Venus Victrix

Venus as the goddess of victory, worshipped particularly in the colonies. At times, called Venus Victrix.

Verbenalia

Festivals in honour of the plant. Vervain which was said to have magic properties. In some accounts, known as Verbenalia, herba sacra, herba sacra or vervain.

Vergilia

Wife of Coriolanus, in some accounts. Others give her name as Volumnia. On occassion, identified as Vergilia, Volumnia, Volumnia or Veturia.

Verginia

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Verginius

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versacrum

A dedication to the gods of the produce of spring. In some references, known as versacrum.

Vertumnus

The god of fertility, fruit trees and gardens. Husband of Pomona. He approached Pomona in many different guises before finally winning her love. Identified as Vertumnus, Vortumnus, Vortumnus, Etruscan Vultumna or Etruscan Vultumna.

Vervacator

A goddess of agriculture. Also known as Vervacator.

Vesper

Venus as the evening star. On occassion, identified as Vesper, Hesper, Hesper, Venus, Greek Hesperus or Greek Hesperus.

Vesta

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Vestal

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Vestalia

A festival for women, in honour of Vesta, held on 9th July. Occasionally called Vestalia.

Vestius Aloneius

An ancient bull-god in Spain. Occasionally identified as Vestius Aloneius.

Veturia

Mother of Coriolanus, some say. Others say her name was Volumnia. Also referred to as Veturia, Volumnia, Volumnia or Vergilia.

Vica Pota

A minor goddess of victory or, some say, of food and drink. In some lore, occasionally called Vica Pota.

victimarius

An official who carried out the slaughter of those animals and humans brought for sacrifice. Also commonly referred to as victimarius.

Victoria

A goddess of victory. Her festival is held on 12th April. In some accounts, known as Victoria, Greek Nike or Greek Nike.

Vinalia

A wine festival in honour of Bacchus or Jupiter, held on 23rd April. In some accounts, called Vinalia.

Virbius

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virga medicinus

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Virgil

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Virtus

A god of military might, the personification of male vigour. In some accounts, known as Virtus.

Volscens

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Voltumna

An Etruscan goddess of vegetation and the south-east wind. On occassion, called Voltumna, Voltumnia, Voltumnia, Volturna, Volturna, Roman Vertumnus or Roman Vertumnus.

Volturnus

The east wind. In some references, known as Volturnus, Tiberinus, Tiberinus, Father Tiber, Volturnus, Vulturnus, Vulturnus or Volturnus.

Volumna

A goddess of infants. Also known as Volumna.

Volumnia

Mother of Coriolanus, in some accounts, in others, his wife. Sometimes referred to as Volumnia, Vergilia, Vergilia, Veturia or Veturia.

Volupta

The goddess of pleasure. Daughter of Cupid and Psyche. Sometimes called Volupta, Joy, Joy, Voluptas or Voluptas.

Vortumnalia

A festival in honour of Vertumnus. Held on 13th August. Known as Vortumnalia.

Vosegus

A Celtic mountain-god in Gaul. Also known as Vosegus.

Vulcan

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Vulcanalia

A festival in honour of the gods, including Vulcan, held on 23rd August. Occasionally known as Vulcanalia, Volcanalia, Volcanalia, Greek Hephaestia or Greek Hephaestia.

Vulcanatis

A flamen of the god Vulcan. Identified as Vulcanatis, Volcanis, Volcanis, Vulcanis or Vulcanis.

vulture

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Roman Mythology