Li Ching

Chinese - A gate-keeper in heaven. Father of Li No Cha. His wife gave birth to a ball of flesh which, when cut open, revealed a baby boy who immediately grew to manhood. In some stories, the boy, Li No-cha, grew to sixty feet and had three heads and eight arms. When Li Ching tried to kill him, the gods intervened and settled the quarrel, promoting Li Ching to a more senior position in heaven. He was originally a Hindu god of thunder taken into the Chinese pantheon as the Pagoda Bearer. Occasionally known as Li Ching, Book of Rites, Book of Rites, Li Ching, Book of Rituals, Book of Rituals, Li Ching, Li, Li, Li, Li T'o-t'a, Li T'ien Wang, Li T'ien Wang, Li Ching, T'o-t'a-li, T'o-t'a-li or Li Ching.
Chinese - The fifth of the 9 major works of the Confucian canon, dealing with proper conduct, written by Confucius. This work has three parts: Chou Li, I Li and Li Chi. In some accounts, known as Li Ching, Book of Rites, Book of Rites, Li Ching, Book of Rituals, Book of Rituals, Li Ching, Li, Li, Li, Li T'o-t'a, Li T'ien Wang, Li T'ien Wang, Li Ching, T'o-t'a-li, T'o-t'a-li or Li Ching.

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