Lamia

Basque - A mermaid or water-sprite. Also referred to as Lamia, Neith, Neith, Athena, Mehet-Weret, Mother of the Gods, Nath, Neit, Net, Nit, African, Great Goddess, Neit, Net, Tehenut or Greek Athena.
British - A poem by Keats. In some lore, occasionally called Lamia, Neith, Neith, Athena, Mehet-Weret, Mother of the Gods, Nath, Neit, Net, Nit, African, Great Goddess, Neit, Net, Tehenut or Greek Athena.
Greek - A monster in the form of a bloodsucking. Woman-serpent. In one story, she was not at first a monster but a sea-nymph or a queen of Libya, one of Zeus' many mistresses who bore him several children, including Herophile and the monster Scylla, most of whom she ate. In this form she was a snake-goddess, queen of Lybia, daughter of Belus. Later she became the blood-sucking monster, one of the Empusae, that some have identified with Medusa. Some say that she had the ability to remove her eyes. In some stories, the jealous Hera stole all Lamia's children by Zeus and, to exact vengeance, Lamia killed all the children she encountered. In some accounts she is equated with Lilith, the first wife of Adam. Also commonly identified as Lamia, Neith, Neith, Athena, Mehet-Weret, Mother of the Gods, Nath, Neit, Net, Nit, African, Great Goddess, Neit, Net, Tehenut or Greek Athena.

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