Italian Lore, Gods, Demigods, Heroes, Symbols, and Other Famous Mythological Characters


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An Etruscan god or goddess of the underworld. In some lore, occasionally called Alpan, Alpanu, Alpanu, Alpnu, Alpnu, Alp(a)nu or Alp(a)nu.

Ariosto, Luduvico

(1477-1533). A poet who wrote stories of Charlemagne's paladins, including Orlando Furioso. At times, known as Ariosto, Luduvico.


A goddess of the hunt. Occasionally referred to as Aritimi, Greek Artemis, Greek Artemis, Aspalis, Bast, Bendis, Delia, Diana, Dzewana, Garbh Ogh, Roman Diana, Roman Diana, Abnoba, Arduinna, Artemis, Delia, Devana, Dilwica, Dziewona or Zana.


An Etruscan goddess of prophecy. In some lore, occasionally identified as Begoe, Bergoia, Bergoia, Beroe, Beroe, Vecu, Vecu, Vegoia, Vegoia, Roman Egeria or Roman Egeria.

Boiardo, Matteo Maria

(1434-1494). A Count of Scandia. He was an Italian poet who wrote stories of Charlemagne's paladins, including the poem Orlando Inamorata. Occasionally called Boiardo, Matteo Maria.

Cagliostro, Alexandro di

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A demon in Dante's Inferno. Occasionally referred to as Cagnazzo, Harrowhound or Harrowhound.


The Etruscan version of Castor. Brother of Pultuce. Castor and Pollux later merged with the Tindaridae. At times, referred to as Castur.


An Etruscan sun deity. Sometimes identified as Catha.


An Etruscan sun-god. Also commonly known as Cautha, Usil, Usil, Cath or Cath.


A fertility deity. Sometimes identified as Declunus, Decluna or Decluna.


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Due Tristani

A 16th C. Story about the children of Tristram and Isolde. Called Due Tristani.


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A fairy. At times, called fata, Tria Fata, Tria Fata, Fata or Fata.


A goddess of chance. Sometimes identified as Fors, Fors Fortuna, Fors Fortuna, Greek Tyche, Greek Tyche, Ardokhsha, Fortuna, Nortia, Roman Fortuna, Roman Fortuna or Tyche.


An Etruscan wine-god. In some lore, occasionally identified as Fufluns, Phuphlans, Phuphlans, Greek Dionysus, Greek Dionysus, Dusara, Liber, Orotalt, Osiris, Rudra, Salmaat or Zagreus.


A bride trapped on her wedding-night. Playing a game, she inadvertently got locked in a chest. Her skeleton was found a year later. In some accounts, called Ginevra, Guinevere, Guinevere, Geneura, Genievre, Ginevra, Guanhamara, Guanhuvara, Guenever, Guenhuvara, Guenevere, Gwennere, Gwynhwfar, Guanamara, Genevra, Guenever(e), Guinever, Gvenour, Gwennere, Wenhaver, French Gilan(e)ier, Welsh Gwen(h)wyfar or Gwenh(w)yvar.


An Etruscan diviner of future events. Occasionally identified as haruspex, haruspices, haruspices, plurharuspices or plurharuspices.


The evil eye: one who brings bad. Luck. In some accounts, referred to as jettatura, Magia, Magia, malocchio, malocchio, evil eye, Corsican ordin, Corsican ordin, magia or magia.


An early mother-goddess. Occasionally called Kerres, Roman Ceres, Roman Ceres or Demeter.


An Etruscan war-god. Sometimes called Laran.


An underworld goddess, goddess of thieves. Also commonly identified as Laverna.


A prince-priest. In some references, identified as lucumo, Tarquinius Priscus, Tarquinius Priscus, Lucius Tarquinius, Lucumo or Tarquin.


Magic: enchantment: the evil eye. Called Magia, jettatura, jettatura, malocchio, Corsican ordin or magia.


A goddess of dawn and dusk, goddess of wisdom. In some lore, occasionally called Menrfa, Menrva, Menrva, Athena, Greek Athena, Greek Athena, Isis, Minerva, Neith, Sirl, Tauret, Thoueris, Ushas, Roman Minerva, Roman Minerva or Britannia.


An Etruscan water-god. Sometimes referred to as Nethuns, Roman Neptune, Roman Neptune or Poseidon.


An Etruscan goddess of fortune. Also identified as Nortia, Nursia, Nursia, Nurtia, Nurtia, Nurti, Nurti, Greek Tyche, Greek Tyche, Ardokhsha, Fors, Fortuna, Roman Fortuna, Roman Fortuna or Tyche.

Penates of the Thunderer

A group of great Etruscan gods. Also referred to as Penates of the Thunderer.


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Pisa, Rusticiano da

A 13th C. Writer who compiled. Arthurian legends. Also identified as Pisa, Rusticiano da.


A sea-monster of Sicily. At times, known as Pongo.


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The Italian version of Reynard the Fox. At times, known as Rainardo.


A Sabine god of marriage and oaths. Sometimes known as Sancus, Semo Sancus, Semo Sancus, Semo, Greek Zeus Pistios, Greek Zeus Pistios, Fidius, Roman Fidius, Roman Fidius or Zeus Pistios.

Senators of the Gods

A group of great gods. In some lore, occasionally identified as Senators of the Gods.

Shrouded Gods

A group of gods of higher rank. Than the Senators of the Gods or the Penates of the Thunderer. Also commonly known as Shrouded Gods.

Storia del Merlino

A 14th C. Italian life of Merlin. Also identified as Storia del Merlino.

Tasso, Torquato

An Italian poet. He wrote about the exploits of Charlemagne and his paladins, including the book Jerusalem Delivered. Known as Tasso, Torquato, (1544-95) or (1544-95).

Tavola Ritonda

A 14th C. Book of Arthurian legends. Also commonly called Tavola Ritonda.

Tristano Panciatochiano

A 14th C. Version of the Tristram and Isolde story in Italian. Occasionally referred to as Tristano Panciatochiano.

Tristano Riccardiano

A 13th C. Version of the Tristram and Isolde story in Italian. Also known as Tristano Riccardiano.


Son of Atys. He was said to have emigrated from Lydia during a famine and is regarded as the founder of the Etruscans. At times, referred to as Tyrrhenus.


A swamp in Tuscany, home of demons. Identified as Valdichiana.


An ancient Umbrian deity. Also commonly referred to as Vofionus.
Italian Mythology