Glaucus

Greek - Son of Minos and Pasiphae. When, as a boy, Glaucus was drowned in a large jar of honey, his father ordered the seer Polyeidus, who found him, to be locked in the store-room with the dead boy. Polyeidus killed one snake when it approached the body but the second snake had a herb in its mouth with which it revived its dead mate. The seer used the same herb to restore Glaucus to life. Some say that it was Asclepius who restored the boy to life. Minos made Polyeides teach Glaucus the arts of prophecy which he did but, when leaving Crete, had the boy spit into his mouth, so taking away all that the boy had learned. Sometimes known as Glaucus, Glaukos, Glaukos, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus or Glaucus.
Greek - A commander of the Lycians at Troy under Sarpedon. Grandson of Bellerophon. Son of Hippolochus. He was connected by family ties to the Greek, Diomedes, and they exchanged armour instead of fighting. He was killed by Ajax in the fighting at Troy and Apollo translated his body on the wind to his own country where a river sprang up at the site of his burial. Also known as Glaucus, Glaukos, Glaukos, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus or Glaucus.
Greek - A sea-god. Son of Anthedon and Alcyone or of Poseidon and Nais. He was a fisherman who fell in love with the nymph Scylla. She spurned him and Circe, who also loved Glaucus, changed her into a monster who wrecked ships and destroyed sailors. Glaucus was changed into a sea god. In another version, the fish he caught ate the grass on which he tipped them from the net and then plunged back into the sea. Glaucus ate some of the grass and felt an irresistible desire to follow them. He entered the sea and became a sea-god protecting fishermen. In some accounts he is identified as Nereus, Phorcos or Proteus. Occasionally known as Glaucus, Glaukos, Glaukos, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus or Glaucus.
Greek - King of Corinth. Son of Sisyphus and Merope. Husband of Eurynome. Father of Bellerophon. He kept a stable of mares which he fed on human flesh. He was killed when his mares bolted and was eaten by them, becoming a Taraxippus. On occassion, identified as Glaucus, Glaukos, Glaukos, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus or Glaucus.
Greek - A helmsman of the Argo. Sometimes known as Glaucus, Glaukos, Glaukos, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus, Glaucus or Glaucus.

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