Diomedes

Greek - King of Argos. Son of Tydeus by Deipyla. Husband of Aegialeia and Euippe. He was the leader of the Epigoni. He fought bravely and well at Troy, wounding Aeneas and even Ares and Aphrodite. He and Odysseus entered the city by night, killing Dolon and Rhesus, and captured the image of Athena, known as the Palladium. He was one of those concealed in the wooden horse. He also exchanged armour with Glaucus, receiving a set made of gold, and rescued Nestor, whose horse had been killed. In some accounts he was a lover of the Trojan girl, Chryseis (Cressida). On his return from Troy, he discovered that his wife Aegialeia had been unfaithful with Cometes, so he went to Italy and married Euippe. With him went Abas, Acmon, Idas, Lycus, Nycteus and Rhexenor, all of whom, after the hero's death, were turned by Aphrodite into swans, which sprinkled water on his grave every day. In some accounts he died naturally in old age while others say that he was murdered by Euippe's father, Darnas. Occasionally known as Diomedes, Diomed, Diomed, Diomede, Diomede, Jason, Jason, Diomedes, Iason, Ieson, 'healer' or Argonauts.
Greek - Son of Aeson and Alcimede, later. Called Jason. Sometimes called Diomedes, Diomed, Diomed, Diomede, Diomede, Jason, Jason, Diomedes, Iason, Ieson, 'healer' or Argonauts.
Greek - King of the Bistonians in Thrace. Son of Ares and Cyrene or of Atlas and his daughter AsteriŽ. He owned four flesh-eating horses and was eaten by them when Heracles seized them as his eighth Labour. Occasionally known as Diomedes, Diomed, Diomed, Diomede, Diomede, Jason, Jason, Diomedes, Iason, Ieson, 'healer' or Argonauts.

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