Coyote

North American - A trickster-god of the Maidu. American Indians. A messenger of the gods. Brother of Wild Cat. Some tribes say that he was created from a mist. He helped Kodoyampe make the world fit for men and then made humans from wooden images. The two creators later quarrelled and fought for a long time before Coyote finally won. To punish a giant who had eaten children, he tricked the giant into believing that he could break a leg and then mend it. The giant agreed that Coyote could perform the same trick on his leg, whereupon Coyote smashed his leg with a rock and left the giant helpless. At the funeral of Ouiot, he snatched a piece of flesh from the corpse and fled. Thereafter, he was known as Eno (the thief) instead of Eyacque. He once gave his blanket to the magic rock, Iya, but snatched it back as soon as he began to feel the cold. The rock chased him, knocked him down and flattened him by rolling right over him. Another story tells how he went to the Spirit World to rescue his sister who had died. There he killed the frog who held the moon-lantern and dressed himself in the frog's skin. He doused the lamp and was able to capture all the spirits and put them in a sack, but he grew tired of their weight and released them, so death still persists. Yet another story tells how Coyote married a woman with teeth in her vagina with which she had killed many lovers. He broke the teeth off with a metal chisel and was safe. Her father tried several times to kill his son-in-law but was unsuccessful. Coyote carved the wooden image of a whale and threw it into the water when he was in a canoe with his father-in-law. The model turned into a killer whale which snatched the girl's father from the canoe and ate him. His ability as a shape-changer is illustrated in a story in which to save himself after falling into a river he changed into a board, which was swept down the river to a dam where a woman retrieved it to use as a serving dish. She was startled when the salmon she placed on the board quickly disappeared, eaten by Coyote, and she threw the board into the fire. Coyote then changed into a baby, which the woman saved and reared as her own. When he grew older, he broke down the dam to allow salmon to go upriver to the home of his own people, but brought a plague of insects on them when he opened four boxes in the woman's barn which she had told him never to touch. Another story relates how when he was starving Woodtick brought him some deer meat. He went to live with her and she kept him well supplied with meat by calling the deer to her tent, where she pierced the ears of two and let the others return to the wild. Coyote thought he could do this himself so he killed (or, some say, expelled) Woodtick. When he tried to do what she had done he failed and all the meat he had turned into deer and ran off, so that Coyote was soon starving again. His own son was killed by a snake bite but did not return to life as expected when immersed in a lake. Some say that Coyote killed himself so that he might roam free as a spirit. In the lore of the Utes, he was the brother of Sunawavi. At times, known as Coyote, Koyote, Koyote, Coyote, Coyote, Mahih-Nah-Tlehey, Mahih-Nah-Tlehey, Coyote, Coyote, Sedit, Sedit, Coyote, Coyote, Coyote, Shunk-Manitou, Shunk-Manitou, Coyote or Coyote.
North American - A trickster-god of the Navaho. The Navaho and a few other tribes maintain that they sprang from the excrement of Coyote whereas all other tribes descended from the union of Coyote and a louse. Coyote and Badger met the Navaho during their ascent from the underworld. He seized two of the children of the monster, Tlieholtsodi, and the monster caused a flood which forced the Navaho to abandon the world they were living in at the time and go up, through a hole made by Badger, into the upper world. Sometimes known as Coyote, Koyote, Koyote, Coyote, Coyote, Mahih-Nah-Tlehey, Mahih-Nah-Tlehey, Coyote, Coyote, Sedit, Sedit, Coyote, Coyote, Coyote, Shunk-Manitou, Shunk-Manitou, Coyote or Coyote.

Nearby Myths