Buddha

Indian - (c. 563-479 BC). A Hindu prince who became known as the Buddha, 'the enlightened one'. Son of King Shuddhodhara and Queen Maya. Husband of Yasodhara. Father of Rahula. He was said to have been born painlessly from his mother's right side, already a youth endowed with the gift of speech. His wife, his horse Kanthaka, his charioteer Chandaka, his disciple Ananda and the bo-tree all appeared at the moment of his birth. Lotus plants grew from his every footprint. When he was born he bore thirty-two primary and eighty secondary marks including such things as a circle of hair between his eyebrows and an elephant, lotus, swastika, horse, etc. Some say that he was born eleven times as a deer. His mother died seven days after his birth and he was raised by an aunt, Mahapajapti. He saw the four signs (a decrepit man, a sick man, a dead man and a monk) that he had been told would manifest themselves when he was to become a Buddha, and troubled by the sight of the suffering in the world, he fled from the luxurious palace his father had built for him and took up the life of a wandering ascetic as Gautama, but this did not bring about the enlightenment he was seeking. This came only after a 28-day (or five-week) period of meditation under the bo tree. Here he was assaulted by the demon Mara who threatened him with devils and tempted him with his seductive daughters, all to no avail. In this period all his previous lives were shown to him, and when a violent tempest arose he was sheltered by the huge body of Muchalinda. He won the hand of Yasodhara by defeating his cousin, Devadatta in contests of skill and strength. As a result, Devadatta became his enemy and made a number of attempts to kill him. As the 'enlightened one', he could have entered Nirvana at once but chose instead to preach, founding an order and a religion. He went up to the Tavatimsa heaven for several months to instruct his mother in his new laws. He passed his enlightened vision to the nagas, the sacred serpents, because he found that it frightened most humans. After preaching for forty-five years he gave up all desire for life and entered Nirvana. His funeral pyre was self-ignited and the residue of his body was a heap of pearls. Some say that his soul underwent 550 transmutations. In Hindu tradition, he was the ninth incarnation of Vishnu and had many other incarnations, including one as a hare who offered his body to Sakka as he had no other food to offer. In a Japanese account the Buddha found a dragon in a ravine who uttered several of the basic truths of Buddhism and demanded human flesh before revealing the final truth. The Buddha offered his own body and as he jumped into the dragon's mouth it turned into the sacred lotus. In some accounts he died as a result of eating boar flesh. There is more than one Buddha; a fresh one appears on earth whenever some special need arises. In the Mahayana version of Buddhism there are said to be some 300,000,000 Buddhas. Also commonly called Buddha, Aditya-Bandhu, Aditya-Bandhu, Buddha, Boodh, Boodh, Boodha, Boodha, Buddh, Buddh, Gautama, Gautama, Gautama Siddhartha, Pali Gotama, Prince Siddhartha, Prince Siddhartha, Pusa, Pusa or Buddha.
Hindu - The ninth incarnation of Vishnu, active in the present age. Sometimes identified as Buddha, Aditya-Bandhu, Aditya-Bandhu, Buddha, Boodh, Boodh, Boodha, Boodha, Buddh, Buddh, Gautama, Gautama, Gautama Siddhartha, Pali Gotama, Prince Siddhartha, Prince Siddhartha, Pusa, Pusa or Buddha.

Nearby Myths