Apollo

British - A king of Lyonesse. Son of Sador and Chelinde. Husband of Gloriande. Father of Canaces. Sador left Chelinde and her son, Apollo, and returned many years later. Apollo, not recognising his father, killed him. In some accounts his father is given as Lucius and Apollo is said inadvertently to have married his own mother. Sometimes identified as Apollo, Abaeus, Abaeus, Apollo, Abaios, Abaios, Apollo, Aleuromantes, Aleuromantes, Apollo, archer god, archer god, Apollo, bowyer god, Delphinius, Delphinius, Apollo, Eulalon, Eulalon, Apollo, Hecates, Hecates, Helius, Helius, Apollo, Helios, Phoebus, sacred animals, sacred birds, Sol, Surya, Titan, Egyptian Ra, Roman Sol, Lycius, Lycius, Lycian, Lycian, Apollo, Pean, Pean, Asclepius, Paeon, Sol or Sol.
Greek - Mouse-god and god of archery, beauty, doors, embarkation, light, medicine, music, poetry, prophecy, public places, roads, shepherds, truth, wolves: one of the Olympians in the Roman pantheon, the god of light, sun. Son of Zeus by Leto. Son of Hephaetus by Athena, some say. Twin brother of Artemis. Brother of Lychnis, some say. He was born on the island of Delos and reared by Themis. While still an infant he killed the serpent Python at Delphi. He fought with Idas for the hand of Marpessa, who chose to marry Idas. He loved the youth Hyacinthus. Grieving at his death, caused by a discus thrown by Apollo but deliberately diverted by the West Wind, made the hyacinth flower spring up where the boy's blood stained the earth. He also loved Cassandra and gave her the power of prophecy, but when she rejected his love, he decreed that her prophecies should never be believed. In similar fashion he granted the Sibyl of Cumae the power of prophecy and as many years as she held grains of sand, but withheld the gift of youth when she rejected his advances, so that she grew old and shrivelled and asked to die. Another lover, the young hunter Cyparissus, died of grief when he accidentally killed the god's pet stag. He was changed by Apollo into a cypress tree. Apollo fell in love with the nymph Daphne, who ran away at his approach. Before he could overtake her, her father, the river-god Peneus, turned her into a laurel tree, which became a tree sacred to Apollo. He fell in love with Coronis and seduced her. When his bird, the raven, told him that she was having an affair with Ischys, he killed her but rescued his unborn son, Asclepius. He turned the raven, until then a white bird, black. In some stories he fathered Asclepius on Arsinoe rather than Coronis and in some the black bird involved is the crow. He had many other affairs and fathered a number of children including: Amphithemis on Pasiphae; Anius on Rhoea; Aristaeus on Cyrene; Asclepius on Coronis or, some say, on Arsinoe; Cycnus on Hyrie; Hygeius on Aethusa; Hyperenor on Aethusa; Iamus on Evadne; Idmon on Cyrene; Ion on Creusa; Linus on Psamathe or Urania; Miletus on Areia or Pasiphae; Mopsus on Manto, some say; Orpheus on Calliope, some say. He changed one of his sons, Cycnus, into a swan. When Zeus slew Asclepius for attempting to raise the dead Hippolytus, Apollo avenged his death by killing the Cyclopes Arges, Brontes and Steropes. For this he was punished by Zeus who condemned him to serve as a slave. In some versions he served King Laomedon, helping Poseidon to build the walls of Troy, in others King Admetus of Thessaly. Some say he served the two kings in separate punishments. With the help of Artemis he killed the giant Tityus who was attempting to rape Leto. He and Artemis killed all fourteen children of Niobe for a slight to the goddess. He engaged in a musical contest with Pan and when Midas adjudged the latter to have won, awarded him the ears of an ass. In a similar contest with the satyr Marsyas, Apollo won and flayed the loser alive. His music helped him when he and Poseidon built the walls of Troy as he was able to charm the stones into position merely by playing his lyre. He turned the Lemnian serpent to having designs on Artemis, Apollo arranged with Mother Earth to have him harried by a huge scorpion, but set him and his lyre in the heavens when he died. At the siege of Troy he helped the Trojans against the Greeks and guided the arrow that killed Achilles. He is credited with the invention of the lute and the cithara and was given the lyre by Hermes. His animal was the dolphin and his bird was the crow (or raven). He is usually depicted with a bow and arrows and accompanied by lions. His chariot was drawn by griffins. In some accounts, referred to as Apollo, Abaeus, Abaeus, Apollo, Abaios, Abaios, Apollo, Aleuromantes, Aleuromantes, Apollo, archer god, archer god, Apollo, bowyer god, Delphinius, Delphinius, Apollo, Eulalon, Eulalon, Apollo, Hecates, Hecates, Helius, Helius, Apollo, Helios, Phoebus, sacred animals, sacred birds, Sol, Surya, Titan, Egyptian Ra, Roman Sol, Lycius, Lycius, Lycian, Lycian, Apollo, Pean, Pean, Asclepius, Paeon, Sol or Sol.

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